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There have been a few articles lately concerning 3-D technology. 

Most notable was the ability of people to "print" a gun with the proper soft-ware using a 3-D printer. 

Many products can now be made in the safety and security of your own home when ever the need arises. 

Company coming and not enough cups and plates?  No problem.  Print them in the style and colour available from soft-ware packages or just 'scan' and 'copy' one that you might already own.

Earring broke?  Scan  and make a copy in minutes!

Technological advances using 3-D is rapidly moving forward.

The cost of a 3-D printer with related materials and knowledge is becoming more readily available to the general public now. 

Countries are now assessing the impact of the technology as the method of production of goods is shifting... again.  3-D technology will quickly replace human labour in many sectors of our society.

Scientists are now able to "print" a bionic ear using animal cells. 

http://lethbridgeherald.com/2013/07/news/world-news/princeton-resea...

Scientists now have the knowledge to "create" parts using living cells.

Think about that!

How long will be it be before "food" can be "printed" using 3-D technology?  When will we be able to design and print a plate of "food", completely cooked and ready to eat in our own home?

All that would be needed is organic material, 3-D technology and a micro-wave.

How will that impact our current form of agricultural production?  Will farmers be producing raw "organic" materials to be processed by 3-D technology?

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Interesting discussion topic Joann,

Here is a video that explains 3D printing.

I am not sure how this will impact the food industry but I am sure the technology can be applied to food.

Take care,

Joe

I think it is just a matter of time before a new form of "food" production with nanotechnology combined with 3-D technology is developed for common public use.

What I see being developed is a protein/organic based medium that can be loaded into a 3-D printer to "create" meals ready for microwave cooking.

I also believe that our current method of food consumption will evolve to the next stage........as history shows......food consumption has changed as our knowledge increased.


Joe Dales said:

Interesting discussion topic Joann,

Here is a video that explains 3D printing.

I am not sure how this will impact the food industry but I am sure the technology can be applied to food.

Take care,

Joe

Hi Joann,

 

Great discussion.

I am struggling to see how this will impact on the food industry that much.

The food companies already process the original grain etc into forms that don't resemble corn, wheat or soybeans.

I do think there will be interesting possibilities if you have a hard plastic 3D printer and need a special part for equipment etc and you build it yourself and install it...some one emails you the part building software....pretty cost and time efficient.

 

Maybe to your point - we bring home a big back of food like stuff...

It is a little Star Trek food machine like, if you ask for a food and it assembles and materializes before you...

 

Interesting possibilities.

 

Take care,

 

Joe

 

Your comparison to the Star Trek food replicator, or shall we say,  food synthesizer might not be too far off the mark. 

Apparently the Penatgon is supporting a Canadian company that has developed something called the "Quantum Stealth".  The cloak is "a type of camouflage that bends light around the wearer or an object to create the illusion of invisibility" .http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2012/12/11/quantum-stealth-invisibilit...

In the LFP today, there is a front page article about a new invisible "shielding" device being tested on amour vehicles at General Dynamics in London, Ontario.

Didn't the earliest Star Trek shows have, the then unheard of, voice commanded computers? Who does not have a smart phone with those capabilities today?

It is not hard to imagine that with the insurgence of nanotechnology and 3-D technology that food can be "replicated" with a protein/organic based medium.  Basic food organics would be processed into a simple medium, bagged as you say, and poured into a copier.  (mind you, I think we are a number of years away concerning taste, texture and price to engage the general public, but I can see it on the horizon).  Agricultural production would be steered into a new dimension to supply the needed raw proteins/organics.

It could be an interesting tool to solve the worlds hunger problems to say the least.
Joe Dales said:

Hi Joann,

 

Great discussion.

I am struggling to see how this will impact on the food industry that much.

The food companies already process the original grain etc into forms that don't resemble corn, wheat or soybeans.

I do think there will be interesting possibilities if you have a hard plastic 3D printer and need a special part for equipment etc and you build it yourself and install it...some one emails you the part building software....pretty cost and time efficient.

 

Maybe to your point - we bring home a big back of food like stuff...

It is a little Star Trek food machine like, if you ask for a food and it assembles and materializes before you...

 

Interesting possibilities.

 

Take care,

 

Joe

 

I don't understand how the nanotechnology would work.

What kind of things would it do?

 

Nanotechnology works on the cellular level.,.....where a particle can be made at 1 billionth of a meter.

There is now a German company that has developed a nano based carrier system that is able to introduce nutrients into foods at the cellular level, for better absorbtion. Foods with higher nutrient levels ( or other nano induced particles such as antiviral elements) will have greater health benefits.

Now couple that with the pioneering technology of mixing cow's fat and stem cells, culturing them and then "printing" a steak?


If nanotechnology can inject nutrients into animal cells, the application of nutrients at the production level will change. Spreading nutrients in the field will quickly be view as an inefficiency.

If 3-D printing can produce meals with cultured animal cells with nano-induced nutrients, agricultural production will change drastically.

If nanotechnology and 3-D printing can overcome a few obvious challenges in the next few years, it will impact production and trade as we know it today.


Roadrunner said:

I don't understand how the nanotechnology would work.

What kind of things would it do?

 

It would appear 3-D printing is growing in leaps and bounds.   If a car can be 'printed' in 44 hours 'using a process called direct digital manufacturing' in Chicago, what else is on the horizon and how does this technology affect our present day mode of manufacturing?

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/world-s-first-three-dimen...

Work is progressing quickly with the concept of printing and cooking food too. 

http://3dprintingindustry.com/2014/08/28/f3d-3d-prints-food-cooks/

The question in the near future will not be "what can be made with digital manufacturing"  but "what can't be digitally manufactured?"

Will agriculture in Ontario experience a paradigm shift with the new digital technology? 3-D technology is an agent of change.

It's now a matter of how agriculture will metamorphose and in what dimension will agriculture propagate and flourish in?  Our society is presently experiencing  a 'peaceful intellectual revolution" via 3-D scientific advancement of which agriculture will be swept into.

From the CBC site: Hen-less egg whites, cow-less milk and practically pig-less meat are projected to appear in grocery stores as early as five years from now in an effort to reduce factory farming via cultured food.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/cultured-meat-eggs-milk-1.3484787

They are now projecting that in 5 short years, our food source will change as consumers are being more conscience of the environmental impact of food production.  (take a lesson from fast food joints and their demands on chicken cages and pig stalls)

But not to be outdone, the Chairman of Nestle, Peter Brabeck-Letmathebelieves that “access to water is not a public right.”  This coming from a company that is well on its way with technology that can scan a body and determine what kind of food it requires and then uses a "replicator" to produce the needed requirements.  Food will become the new "medicine" to keep bodies functioning properly.  Of course, the replicators will need water as the primary agent.

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/nestl-want...

Yes, our food supply will change and yes, water will be of prime importance in the evolution of "food" production, and yes, I strongly believe some in our government are acutely aware of the technology coming down the chute.

How many farmers will truly be needed a generation from now if technology can produce 'food' inside labs? How many farmers in parts of Ontario and Quebec know they have "rights" to their water on their land? 

Water will be the key to the future of "food" preparation.

Joe Dales said:

Interesting discussion topic Joann,

Here is a video that explains 3D printing.

I am not sure how this will impact the food industry but I am sure the technology can be applied to food.

Take care,

Joe

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