Ontario Agriculture

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Equine Community for Ontario

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Equine Community for Ontario

Horse lovers are invited to join and share and connect with the equine community in Ontario

Location: Ontario
Members: 12
Latest Activity: Dec 7, 2012

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Comment by Jennifer Garner on July 15, 2011 at 9:40am
I'm looking for 1977 - 1979 alumni of the Humber College Equine program.  Anyone out there?
Comment by Mackenna Roth on July 8, 2011 at 3:56pm

Hi Cindy,

I would love to see some pictures of your horses!
My family farm is based on the Equine industry, we have horse shows, hunter paces and other horse related events and clinics. We also offer boarding and lessons. Where abouts are you located??
Mac

Comment by Cindy Filmore on July 6, 2011 at 8:33pm
Lovely, Mackenna! Very nice horse. Once I figure things out a little more, I will attempt to post our horses.
Do you ride for pleasure, or is part of your farm business?
We have 4 horses for our own riding, and offer "byoh" camping to others. Lots of local trails here!
Comment by Mackenna Roth on May 10, 2011 at 2:12pm
My cute horse and I warming up in the arena
Comment by AgOntario on April 26, 2011 at 8:07am

Strangles Outbreak Northern Ontario

The Ontario Ministry of Agriculture Food and Rural Affairs has recently been made aware of a number of premises in the Greater  Sudbury area and Manitoulin Island affected by Strangles.   Strangles is a highly contagious bacterial disease of horses characterized by abscesses in the lymphoid tissue of the upper respiratory tract. The causative organism, Streptococcus equi subspecies equi, is highly host-adapted and generally produces clinical disease only in horses, donkeys, and mules.

Strangles is an endemic disease in horses and circulates relatively commonly in the horse population.   A significant number of affected premises in a relatively confined geographical area is a good reminder to horse owners and veterinarians to  practise appropriate biosecurity procedures for horses and equipment coming on and off the farm AND infection control within the barn. 

Transmission occurs via fomites and direct contact with infectious exudates. Sharing of halters and brushes that may contact the fluid from draining abscesses can spread the disease. The source of Strangles on any of these premises could have been the entry of a new horse, contact with a carrier somewhere off the farm (e.g. at a show) or on the clothing, hands or equipment of a visitor (such as a feed supplier, farrier or veterinarian who had recent contact with an infected horse).   Survival of the organism in the environment is dependent on temperature and humidity.   Under ideal environmental circumstances, the organism can survive 7-9 weeks outside the host. Paddocks and barn facilities used by infected horses should be regarded as contaminated for about 2 months after resolution of an outbreak.

Carrier animals are important for maintenance of the bacteria between epizootics and initiation of outbreaks on premises previously free of disease. Horse owners need to be aware that clinically recovered animals should have three negative nasopharyngeal swabs to be determined “Strangles-free”. 

Recommendations regarding vaccination can be found in the disease factsheets from the sources listed below.  These sources also contain excellent information on basic biosecurity practices and infection control.

Strangles is a good opportunity to remind your clients that the best disease control is disease prevention.

RESOURCES
OMAFRA
http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/livestock/horses/facts/03-037.htm
http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/livestock/horses/facts/prot_str...
http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/livestock/horses/facts/prev-dis...
http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/livestock/horses/news/jul02.htm

EQUINE GUELPH
http://www.equidblog.com
http://www.equineguelph.ca/education/equiplanner_guidelines_strangl...
http://www.equineguelph.ca/pdf/facts/vacc_guidelines_print_FINAL.pdf

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF EQUINE PRACTITIONERS
http://www.aaep.org/strangles.htm

The Horsemen's Benevolent and Protective Association of Ontario
http://www.hbpa.on.ca/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/Strangles_Protocol...

Comment by OntAG Admin on February 20, 2011 at 5:33pm
Comment by OntAG Admin on January 30, 2011 at 11:39am

Here is a video from SPARK on the Equine Industry in Ontario.

 

 

Members (12)

 
 
 

Agriculture Headlines from Farms.com Canada East News - click on title for full story

Monitoring Canola for Cabbage Seedpod Weevil and Tarnished Plant Bug

Cabbage seedpod weevil (CSW) are being found in spring canola, particularly in earlier planted fields that are beginning to flower. CSW may begin to appear just prior to bolting and can primarily be found on flower buds until pods begin to form.

Ontario Field Crop Report, June 21, 2018: Sulphur response in Ontario’s field crops

Sulphur (S) had been a neglected nutrient in Ontario for many years. For decades, in much of Ontario, sulphur came in significant quantities from the sky – deposited from emissions from industrial activity. Even before that, impurities in fertilizers and more widespread application of manure helped ensure a regular addition of sulphur to our soils.

Simcoe Agribusiness Breakfast Meeting Minutes – June 20, 2018

High winds, hail and pounding rain in some of the area over the past week has added frustration to an already difficult spring seeding season. A category F2 tornado with maximum wind speeds of 180 km/hr along with significant hail cut a path about 30 km and up to ½ km wide from the Norwich to Fisherville area. Thunderstorms (and hail) Wednesday June 13 and Monday June 18 brought “the million dollar rain” for many producers with anywhere from 0 to 90 mm of precipitation. Pounding rains caused significant soil erosion and crusting in some newly planted fields. Soil health and infiltration capacity differences between neighbouring fields was evident in surface runoff. Conditions remain dry in much of the region and additional “gentle” rainfalls would be welcomed.

Ridgetown Agribusiness Breakfast Meeting – June 19, 2018

This is the final meeting for spring 2018. A fall meeting was discussed: stay tuned. Most areas in Southwestern Ontario received some rain yesterday (Monday). Amounts varied widely, 2-80 mm, most areas receiving 10-20 mm. For most growers it was a critical boost, although not really enough. Parts of Niagara are the exception, and they got hammered again.

The 3rd Annual Progressive Agriculture Safety Day in Oxford County

The 3rd Annual Progressive Agriculture Safety Day in Oxford County was held on June 12, at AJ Baker Public School in Kintore. Progressive Agriculture Safety Days (PAF), founded in 1995, are held annually across North America, coordinated by local communities looking to bring attention to agricultural safety among rural youth.

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