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So I know there are a few types of seeders out there. I am looking for some pros and cons about a couple types. Hopefully you can help.

Air seeders

I know these are better for smaller seeds

Can cover a large amount of ground without having to refill.

Planters

Better at precision planting. Better depth control.

Box drill ( are they John Deere specific?)

Can be used for multiple types of seeds.

What other types of seeders are there out there?

What are other pros and cons of these types of seeders above?

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Hi Iain,

Seeding technology is a pretty wide topic.

Really depends upon the crop and how many acres you have.

Western Canada has alot of interesting air seeder options - small seed crops and vast acreages.

In Eastern Canada a 12 row corn planter is pretty standard on the larger cash crop farms.

It is farm show season, you might want to check out the major equipment companies and what is new.

RR

Thanks for replying. 

Yeah there does seem to be a lot of seeding technology out there.

Roadrunner said:

Hi Iain,

Seeding technology is a pretty wide topic.

Really depends upon the crop and how many acres you have.

Western Canada has alot of interesting air seeder options - small seed crops and vast acreages.

In Eastern Canada a 12 row corn planter is pretty standard on the larger cash crop farms.

It is farm show season, you might want to check out the major equipment companies and what is new.

RR

Hi Iain,

 

Here is a video we did this spring at Blaney Grain Farms - John Deere planter getting the corn planted.

 

 

Wow thanks for pointing out those video. Some really cool technology these days.

I need to get my hands on some to play with it to know how to use it better. One of these days. 

How long does it take to set up autosteer ?

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