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can someone go through the different types of harrows and what the advantage of each is?

I have found a few already like tine, spring, chain, but I am not sure what the advantage of each is.

Any help would be appreciated. 

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Diamond harrows, bar harows, rolling harrows, etc.... What is your budget? What conditions are you heading into? (lots of residue?), What is the result you are trying to get.

I am not an expert on harrows (my disclaimer) but this is what I see. My neighbor uses his chain harrows on the pasture/hay ground in the spring (sometimes). The chain harrow has two sides with the prongs longer on one side. It can handle residue up to a certain point.

Diamond harrows are often out front of the roller after planting grain with underseeding.

Bar harrows you often see behind cultivators to level things off, you may see the tine harrows there also but they might not be as aggressive. 

Rolling harrows are sometimes behind the bar or tine harrows. They tend to firm up the soil surface more than any of the others, this may be an advantage if the wheather will be dry after planting.

The tine harrows, I have a set behind the RTS and they seem to keep up without draging too much residue along (in corn stalks).

Don't forget the spike harrows, you might see a set at an auction. I think they might have been used to level off the plowed ground in the spring.

Hope this helps and/or starts the discussion.

Peasant62

Wow thanks Peasean62. Thanks for taking the time to answer my question.

I am not familiar with the diamond harrow. Do you have any pictures of one of those?

Also, is it possible to elaborate on some of the advantages of each ?

Thanks again

Lots of different types of harrows.

Here is a picture of my friend Larry trying a Philllips Harrow this spring on his heavy ground near Milton, Ontario.

http://ontag.farms.com/photo/phillips-rotary-harrow-in-action?conte...

 

Joe

Thanks Joe. 

That is a cool picture that you linked there.

Joe Dales said:

Lots of different types of harrows.

Here is a picture of my friend Larry trying a Philllips Harrow this spring on his heavy ground near Milton, Ontario.

http://ontag.farms.com/photo/phillips-rotary-harrow-in-action?conte...

 

Joe

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