Ontario Agriculture

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Hi everyone! I am a third-year journalism student at Loyalist College. Currently, I am working on a documentary about women on the family farm.

I want to explore how these days, women are taking on more active roles than ever before, while at the same time, running homes, raising children, and in some cases, even working outside of the home. I want to know what they think of this shift, and what it means in terms of lifestyle. How do they do it all? How are their husbands/partners supportive? Why is this change significant? Etc.

If anyone lives around the Belleville area and is interested in doing an interview, or knows anyone in the Belleville area, I would really appreciate your help.

Also, if anyone has any other suggestions on how to approach the story, that would be appreciated as well.

Thank you so much!

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Replies to This Discussion

I do not live in the Belleville area but I have raised four children as we started our farm, the need for the second income could not be denied as my husband has worked off farm for 25 years. As a result full responsibility for the day to day decisions and planning have become my responsibility. I am 51 and looking back now I wonder how I managed, I guess all I can say is that there were allot of long hours trying to keep house and keep a normal life for my children. I do know that there we times throughout the year that you just had to pick the things that you can live with, maybe a little more clutter and dirt in the house then you would like. I do know that I made the time to go to my children's class trips and let the fields wait. I always knew when I put in too many hours, as  I could count on every spring planting season and every harvest my youngest would  always crawl into my bed at 3:00 am. I am a grandmother now and when my first grandchild was born my heart ached because I really felt that at this point in my life I should be able to spend more time with them. I have considered a combine with a jump seat. I have been really lucky that I was able to employ my daughter who brings my grandchildren to work, she now keeps my house in shape while I run the employees and the fields.

Hope this helps you.

 

 

Hi there Rosemarie,

 

Whereabouts are you from? Even though you might live far away, I could still interview you for a print story, if you'd be interested? 

Thanks for your reply..it sounds like you have lived a very busy life on the farm!

 

 

 

Fenwick Ontario close to the St.Catharines Niagara Falls area

That would be okay! We could do a phone interview sometime..it will give the story a broader voice than just local farmers. I'll give you my email so we can arrange a date for an interview, etc.

 

katrinageenevasen@gmail.com

 

 

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