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Is OASC going to be able to do what it was set up to do, or are the governments going to finger point and try and make it self destroy?

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The government, in my opinion, will not point fingers as they really don't care about the farmer in any way, shape or form.

The government, again my private opinion, has an interest in agribusiness.

Domestic farmers (the persons) are of no consequence in the grand scheme of things in the mind of political advisors.

The government is on solid track towards free enterprise with a belief that 'persons' need more personal accountability. Some in government would argue that "more personal accountability" or more 'self reliance' would break the cycle of dependency on government and its financial resources which is the larger prize in todays' economic environment.

I believe we will be forced into changing our farming lives..... in the very near future.

"It is one thing to give a handout but another to give a hand up." ...... ah yes... a maxim from political advisors that don't have a clue about agricultural rights.....
I think the OASC will be able to accomplish a couple things:
- show that the farmers do have the ability to speak with one voice given the right circumstances.
- throw an opportunity on the desk of either level of government to take charge of the leadership of agriculture policy in Ontario.
The first level of goverment, or the first party in the government system, to fully fund the OASC request will be a shoo-in for the next election. It will then be up to the OASC to convince the urbanite who they should vote for.
It is possible, we just need the leadership.
This email was sent to me and an Ontario pork producer asked me to post it for others to know their thoughts and opinions. Thanks, Joe


To Whom This May Concern,



If the pork industry is unable to receive valiant financial aid from our Government in the near future, this industry will deteriorate rapidly. Without a financial program set in place in Ontario comparable to that in Quebec, many people will suffer job losses. Like many industries, the pork industry works with a boomerang effect. When one aspect of the chain diminishes, the pork farmers in current terms, many components of the chain will proportionally terminate. Therefore, due to many farmers becoming bankrupt, there will be many related employment to this industry such as veterinarians, feed companies, machinery manufacturers, Government Agricultural workers etcetera also suffering and can furthermore lead to bankruptcy as well due to job loss.

The Agri Stability Program that is currently in place is not beneficial to pork farmers, especially those who feed their own home grown crops to their herd. Farmers from Quebec have sufficient financial security in the ASRA Program. It is not ethical to fund their needs alone as all Canadian pork farmers are in the same desperation to continue their business.

The foreseen future from the path that we are currently encompassing by default will also lead to American pork plaguing our Canadian plates and cutlery. ’ In Canada, we have worked hard on our food safety and traceability so we know what we put in our mouths. Canadian pork is much more wholesome, without the unnatural ‘enrichment’ of unnecessary hormones and medicines that Americans rely on to make their product ‘better. The CFIA do not permit the use of some of these feed additives to enhance our meat. With American pork crossing the border into Canada, we will be less informed and confident in knowing what the meat contains. We should not be forced to eat American pork when we have the facilities to create our own better and more safe pork.

This has been an ongoing issue for the past 3 years. With this accumulating issue and poor Governmental support we have received to date showing no signs of improvement, the death of the pork industry is vastly approaching. Your help is crucial to keep pork farming alive in Canada. The missing piece to fix this disaster is virtually in your hands.
Unforrtionatly agriculture is bankrupt of any form of leadership.... OFA and Commodity Boards.

Wayne Black said:
I think the OASC will be able to accomplish a couple things:
- show that the farmers do have the ability to speak with one voice given the right circumstances.
- throw an opportunity on the desk of either level of government to take charge of the leadership of agriculture policy in Ontario.
The first level of goverment, or the first party in the government system, to fully fund the OASC request will be a shoo-in for the next election. It will then be up to the OASC to convince the urbanite who they should vote for.
It is possible, we just need the leadership.
Was anyone at the Stratford OASC town hall meeting?

Any report on how the meeting went?

Thanks
Town Hall meeting was good, unfortunately it was only half full of people. Lots of press their.

pigsrgr8 said:
Was anyone at the Stratford OASC town hall meeting?

Any report on how the meeting went?

Thanks
I think it went well. Lots of media and it gave lots of opportunity to educate the media on what OASC is about and what the benefits are. It is difficult to provide a traditional media scrum when you have so many "leaders" involved. As usual though, the typical political answers were given and not much meat.
Next stop may be more interesting.

pigsrgr8 said:
Was anyone at the Stratford OASC town hall meeting? Any report on how the meeting went?

Thanks
Joe Dales said:
I found this video with OFA comments on the coalition.

Joe


A very articulate speaker. Thank you for posting this video.

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