Ontario Agriculture

The network for agriculture in Ontario, Canada

Attention all Farmers, Retailers and Distributors

 

We are a new import company specializing in fertilizer products, primarily UREA 46 from Eastern Europe.

 

We are importing high quality UREA 46 comparable to Canadian UREA 46 at discounted rates for the Canadian agriculture industry nationwide.

 

We could sell UREA to individual farmers or to a group of farmers at discounted rates. 

 

For orders over 25,000MT we offer even greater discounts. 

 

Delivery time to Canada approx. 3 months.

We can deliver UREA with 46% Nitrogen or other Nitrogen content as per buyer's request.

We can deliver plain UREA or premixed UREA as per buyer's request.

We can deliver UREA in bulk or 50kg bags.

We can deliver granular or prilled UREA.

No need to deal with any foreign suppliers, brokers, foreign regulations, etc. as all orders are placed directly with our company based in Toronto, registered in the province of Ontario and subject to Canadian regulations and standards. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me.   

Yours truly,

Ron Schneider
VP Sales

 

AGAR Commodity Group Inc.

35 Finch Ave. East, Suite 206

Mobile:  416-898-4288

Office:  416-271-5273

Fax:  877-261-8303

Email:  ron@agargroup.ca

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that sounds good to me.
can you tell us a little bit more about your self, your company and your history.
your mandate and longterm goal?
Dear rein minnema

You are welcome to email your inquiries to: ron@agargroup.ca

Please include your company name, address and complete contact information.

Also provide specific details about your inquiry.

Yours truly,

Ron Schneider,
VP Sales

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