Ontario Agriculture

The network for agriculture in Ontario, Canada

Congratulations Joel Jarvis! Ontario farmer breaks World Record for largest squash.


At 674.3 kg or 1,486.6 pounds, Joel Jarvis' squash beats the old record of 560 kg or 1,234 pounds as confirmed by Guinness World Records.


Article in The Star:

SIMCOE, ONT. — Joel Jarvis watched with the anticipation of an expectant father as his baby put on as much as 40 pounds a day.

The St. Thomas resident knew it was going to be a big one but never imagined in his wildest dreams that it would easily “squash” the world records.

His prizewinning squash tipped the scales at 674.3 kg or 1,486.6 pounds, easily eclipsing the old record of 560 kg or 1,234 pounds as confirmed by Guinness World Records.

Jarvis broke the record on Oct. 1 at the Port Elgin Pumpkinfest, which Jarvis describes as the “Kentucky Derby” for giant vegetables.

“This has been a long time coming,” he told the Toronto Star. “I’m 38 and I have been doing this since I was 11,” said the horticulturist, who got his training at the Nova Scotia Agricultural College in Truro, N.S.

“Sometimes the wind blows the right way and the sun shines right.”

No matter how you slice it, this is a big deal in the world of oversized vegetables. Word is seeds from the world’s largest pumpkin last year sold for more than $1,600 apiece.

“To be honest I might get $40 a seed,” said Jarvis, who figures his various prize monies — including from the Giant Vegetable Growers of Ontario — will add up to as much as $8,000, and that will likely go toward a new van now that his family has just expanded by one.

That’s right, he’s also the proud papa of a seven-pound baby girl, Rayna, who decided to arrive just as he was showing off his prize squash.

The added twist to the gargantuan squash is that it out-plumped the largest pumpkin at the Norfolk County Fair, which Jarvis also grew. The pumpkin weighed 1,426 pounds or 646.822 kg and fetched $2,000 in prize money at the fair in Simcoe, Ont. The squash, meanwhile, won $300.

As far as anyone knows in the 171 years of the Norfolk County Fair, this is the first time a squash beat out a pumpkin on the scales, according to Karen Matthews, the fair’s general manager.

The heaviest pumpkin on record weighed 821.23 kg (1,810 lb. 8 oz.) and was presented by Chris Stevens at the Stillwater Harvest Fest in Stillwater, Minn., on Oct. 9, 2010, according to the Guinness Book of Records.

Jarvis says his squash is not genetically modified but is the result of cross breeding and a whole bunch of fertilizers and non-stop tender-loving care. It was planted on May 6.

“You start off with a little seedling and it grows the same length of time as a regular squash or pumpkin, but as soon as you get it in the ground you are pushing it to the extreme with your fertilizers,” he said.

Jarvis said the vegetables actually grew for about 90 days and “there were days that it was putting on average 35 to 40 pounds a day. That’s bad for people, but when you are talking pumpkins and squash. . . ”

He said most people think that given its size, the squash wouldn’t be edible, “but my wife (Kristine) made squash soup last year with ours (another whopper of a squash) and it was fantastic.”

 

 

Views: 406

Reply to This

Agriculture Headlines from Farms.com Canada East News - click on title for full story

Canola group demands Ottawa 'consider all available options' in China seed dispute

China's refusal thus far to accept a Canadian delegation to work out a solution to an ongoing canola seed trade dispute that's left farmers and exporters scrambling calls for more urgent action from Ottawa, says an industry group.

Ontario Field Crop Report – Week of April 15th, 2019

To date, very little field activity due to cool, wet spring so far this season. Most areas received significant rain this past weekend, resulting in saturated soils and ponding in fields (Figure 1) and in a few spots some soil erosion. Overall temperatures have been too cold to stimulate new growth on the winter wheat or alfalfa yet.

Minister's Statement on Agricorp Chair Appointment

Ernie Hardeman, Ontario's Minister of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs, issued the following statement:

Ontario Takes The Federal Carbon Tax to Court

Ontario is protecting what matters most and standing up for the people by taking the next step in opposing the federal government's unconstitutional carbon tax, which threatens Ontario jobs and makes life less affordable for families, students, seniors and communities.

Ontario Protecting Security of the People by Opposing the Carbon Tax

Ontario is protecting what matters most by fighting increased costs to community safety services caused by the imposition of a burdensome federal carbon tax. Rod Phillips, Minister of the Environment, Conservation and Parks, and Solicitor General Sylvia Jones were at the Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) Port Credit detachment today to talk about how the federal government's carbon tax will impact local correctional facilities and OPP detachments.

© 2019   Created by Darren Marsland.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service