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I was wondering if anyone has ever tried this, and if you have what were the results?

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Hi Chris:

I believe maturities have been the reason this is not a common practice in Ontario...I do know it works in the Southern USA...

Here is the best agronomic information from the closest state - OHIO...

Joe

Double-Cropping Soybeans Following Wheat
AGF-103-01
Dr. Jim Beuerlein
Professor
Ohio State University Ag Extension

Ohio farmers have an opportunity to increase their productivity by double-cropping on one million acres of wheat each year. The 10 to 12 weeks of growing season that remain after wheat harvest are enough to grow a second crop of soybeans. Although yield potential for double-crop soybeans is reduced by late planting, the value of the combined soybean and wheat crop makes this practice economically competitive with full-season corn and soybean crops.

Careful management is required for production of a profitable second crop. The soybean planting date is critical in determining productivity of the system. At the time of wheat harvest, the potential yield of soybeans is decreasing by at least one bushel per acre for each day that planting is delayed. Thus, every effort must be made to get the wheat harvested and the soybeans seeded as early as possible. Selecting an early-maturing wheat variety can allow for harvest five to seven days before the late varieties are ready. Wheat can be harvested when grain moisture is 18 to 20 percent with no loss of quality and will permit soybean planting to be advanced from three to five days. Planting the wheat immediately after the fly-safe date often hastens its development, leading to a slightly earlier harvest. If planting cannot be completed by July 10, double-cropping should not be attempted.

The straw remaining after wheat harvest must be considered. While excessive amounts of straw can interfere with the soybean planting operation, some wheat stubble (12 inches) should be left on the field to provide mulch cover for the soybean crop. Straw passing through the combine should be chopped and spread widely or baled and removed. Using a stripper header is also an ideal way to leave the wheat straw in the field without it interfering with soybean planting.

Soil moisture present at the time of wheat harvest is the critical factor for determining the potential yield of the soybean crop. If soil is quite dry at the time of harvest, double-cropping should not be attempted. Soybean seed planted into dry soil will not germinate until enough rain falls to allow germination. This may occur too many days after harvest for satisfactory crop growth and yield. If the subsoil has been depleted of moisture by the wheat crop, soybean growth will depend totally on rainfall. Usually rainfall amounts during July ­ September are inadequate to support adequate growth of the second crop. Most failures can be avoided by not planting when the soil is dry at the time of wheat harvest. "If June is dry, do not try." The soybean crop should be planted without tillage to save all available moisture.

Selection of the proper soybean variety is critical. Varieties that are extremely early maturing for an area do not yield as well as later-maturing varieties. In general, a variety with a mid-season maturity rating for the area is usually the best choice. For fields near I-70 that can be planted on July 4, a variety with relative maturity of 3.4 to 3.8 will be suitable most years.

Narrow rows (7 inches) are required for maximum yield of double-crop soybeans. Because of late planting, the soybeans flower about 30 days after emergence, resulting in small plants. Since the plants will be small, the planting rate should be increased to 4 seeds/ft. in 7-inch rows.

With no-tillage planting, weed control with herbicide is essential for satisfactory production of the second crop. Wheat stubble ordinarily contains many weed seedlings that must be controlled. When competition from the wheat is removed, these weed seedlings will develop rapidly and compete severely with soybeans. Herbicides selected and rates of application used for weed control in double-crop soybeans should kill the weeds present at planting time and provide residual control of weeds emerging from seed. The use of Roundup Ready soybean varieties and Roundup Ultra for weed control almost guarantees perfect weed control.

Adequate amounts of phosphorus and potassium may be applied for both crops when planting the wheat.

Double-cropping is not a practice for everyone. Unless producers are willing to follow closely the management procedures outlined here, they should not attempt double-cropping. By adding the value of 20 to 30 bushels per acre of soybeans to the value of the wheat crop, double-cropping soybeans after wheat becomes quite competitive economically with other cropping practices. In fields where soybean diseases are a major problem, double-cropping soybeans will make those problems worse and should not be attempted.
After a little more digging....here is an article from the OMAFRA website from 2 years ago...you may want to call your extension rep...

Joe

Double Cropping Soybeans
Author: Horst Bohner - Soybean Specialist/OMAFRA Stratford

Creation Date: 25 July 2008
Last Reviewed: 25 July 2008


Winter wheat harvest is now well underway. With higher commodity prices and lots of soil moisture there is renewed interest in double cropping soybeans after wheat. A number of early harvested wheat fields have already been seeded to soybeans. Double cropping is not generally practiced in Ontario, because our growing season is too short and there is often insufficient moisture in mid-summer to establish the crop. This year moisture is adequate in most regions. Double cropping soybeans has been attempted with limited success in Essex and Kent counties when wheat came off early. This year the wheat has not come off early so the likelihood of success is relatively small unless September weather ends up being unusually warm. In Southwestern Ontario it's possible to achieve a 20-30 bu/ac crop if planting on July 1st and everything else going right. However, the 30 bu/acre yield potential on July 1st drops approximately 1 bu/ac/day. Attempting to double crop after July 15th has little chance of success unless there is a very long fall. If double cropping is attempted consider the following points:

The low yield potential of such a late planted crop means that input costs must be kept at a minimum. The keys to a successful soybean double crop are adequate moisture and a long, open fall.
Harvest wheat as early as possible. Every day counts. Spread chaff and straw evenly. Aim for an 8- 12" stubble height - this helps to ensure stem elongation for higher bottom pod height without impeding early growth.
If there is no moisture to a depth of 2.5 inches, plant at 1.5 inches and wait for rain. Success will be rain dependent. If conditions are extremely dry, do not attempt to double crop. Most double crop failures can be attributed to beans being planted into dry conditions.
In fields where soybean diseases are a major problem, double-cropping will make those problems worse. Consider the rotational implications.
Control weeds in wheat, either before planting or before emergence of soybeans. Also, plan the herbicide program to control volunteer wheat.
Plant in narrow rows with high seeding rates. Aim for 250,000 seeds/acre in 7.5 inch rows. The quicker a full canopy is achieved the better.
Choose tall, small seeded varieties;
In greater than 2800 CHU areas choose a
variety close to full maturity
In areas with less than 2800 CHU's choose a variety with slightly lower CHU's than full season. Choosing very short day maturities (<2500) is not a good option. Short season soybeans planted very late will not yield well because the plants will not grow tall enough. Full season beans will provide greater height and better pod set. Due to the photo period effect a full season bean will not mature significantly later than a short day bean.
There is no crop insurance for such a late planted crop
Thanks for the information. I know someone who tried it last year with a 29 bushel yield. I thought i would look into it and ask around you see if anyone else had tried it with good results!
Thanks!

Joe Dales said:
After a little more digging....here is an article from the OMAFRA website from 2 years ago...you may want to call your extension rep...

Joe

Double Cropping Soybeans
Author: Horst Bohner - Soybean Specialist/OMAFRA Stratford

Creation Date: 25 July 2008
Last Reviewed: 25 July 2008


Winter wheat harvest is now well underway. With higher commodity prices and lots of soil moisture there is renewed interest in double cropping soybeans after wheat. A number of early harvested wheat fields have already been seeded to soybeans. Double cropping is not generally practiced in Ontario, because our growing season is too short and there is often insufficient moisture in mid-summer to establish the crop. This year moisture is adequate in most regions. Double cropping soybeans has been attempted with limited success in Essex and Kent counties when wheat came off early. This year the wheat has not come off early so the likelihood of success is relatively small unless September weather ends up being unusually warm. In Southwestern Ontario it's possible to achieve a 20-30 bu/ac crop if planting on July 1st and everything else going right. However, the 30 bu/acre yield potential on July 1st drops approximately 1 bu/ac/day. Attempting to double crop after July 15th has little chance of success unless there is a very long fall. If double cropping is attempted consider the following points:

The low yield potential of such a late planted crop means that input costs must be kept at a minimum. The keys to a successful soybean double crop are adequate moisture and a long, open fall.
Harvest wheat as early as possible. Every day counts. Spread chaff and straw evenly. Aim for an 8- 12" stubble height - this helps to ensure stem elongation for higher bottom pod height without impeding early growth.
If there is no moisture to a depth of 2.5 inches, plant at 1.5 inches and wait for rain. Success will be rain dependent. If conditions are extremely dry, do not attempt to double crop. Most double crop failures can be attributed to beans being planted into dry conditions.
In fields where soybean diseases are a major problem, double-cropping will make those problems worse. Consider the rotational implications.
Control weeds in wheat, either before planting or before emergence of soybeans. Also, plan the herbicide program to control volunteer wheat.
Plant in narrow rows with high seeding rates. Aim for 250,000 seeds/acre in 7.5 inch rows. The quicker a full canopy is achieved the better.
Choose tall, small seeded varieties;
In greater than 2800 CHU areas choose a
variety close to full maturity
In areas with less than 2800 CHU's choose a variety with slightly lower CHU's than full season. Choosing very short day maturities (<2500) is not a good option. Short season soybeans planted very late will not yield well because the plants will not grow tall enough. Full season beans will provide greater height and better pod set. Due to the photo period effect a full season bean will not mature significantly later than a short day bean.
There is no crop insurance for such a late planted crop
Reply on OntAg Twitter:

HeyBrendan @OntAg Tried two years ago, complete waste of time and effort. Had rain right up until and post planting then dried up. Not again!!
had a friend who used to fly them in to wheat every year. i loved it because i got rid of a lot of treated seed. not sure if he still does it or not. in our area it would PROBABLY work this year because we have moisture. better is to find a run out alfalfa fied and offer to spray it in return for 90 percent of the yield or whatever you think is fair. you can insure them if planted before june 22nd i beleive but agricorp want s to look at them before they insure them
So there isnt anyone who has done it sucessfully?

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