Ontario Agriculture

The network for agriculture in Ontario, Canada

Well, usually I am a very up-beat, optimistic person. Today, not so much! This year has been really challenging. Worrying about white rot in the wet onion fields, sclerotinia in the carrots, Onion harvest should be winding down right now, and it has barely begun. The onions didn't mature properly this year, some are still standing for heaven sake, not even dug yet! We have crop insurance on the onions, as do many Farmers, but that's not exactly a light at the end of the tunnel! I'm sure they'll find some way to weasel out of having to pay the Farmers for their losses, one way or another. Any onions that have been harvested may or may not dry properly. Farmers who have dryers are using them, but that adds additional costs to the production of this product, on top of the higher than normal input costs already incurrred to keep the onions healthy during the damp summer we've had. The buyers of onions are only willing to pay $5.50 /50# right now. We need at least $6.00, just to break even. When is our government going to realize that the trade they insist on having does not come with fair playing rules. We cannot compete with our trading partners in the global market. There are too many unequal variables, and they're not in our favour!

Views: 126

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

I hear ya'. Some white bean fields in Huron County are getting into that "questionable" stage. Farmers are starting to get edgy about the soybeans. Some corn fields, locally, are starting to lodge due to the wet weather. I checked the corn a few days ago - no where near ready. This past week some farmers have done corn silage (thanks for the cattle to eat that up!) when they have been doing it early September (month late!). If we did not have the cattle to eat corn silage there would be a lot of wasted crop this fall.
Wonder if the cattle would like a top dressing of onions and carrots on their silage?
There's going to be lots of cull onions, but I don't think cattle or pigs would even want to eat them. As a result of the cold damp Spring, smut became a problem, and since the entire growing season has been damp, that has encouraged white rot in some varieties of onions (some can resist). I guess, even though we're in different sectors, we have very similar problems. Oh, the joys of being a Farmer!

Wayne Black said:
I hear ya'. Some white bean fields in Huron County are getting into that "questionable" stage. Farmers are starting to get edgy about the soybeans. Some corn fields, locally, are starting to lodge due to the wet weather. I checked the corn a few days ago - no where near ready. This past week some farmers have done corn silage (thanks for the cattle to eat that up!) when they have been doing it early September (month late!). If we did not have the cattle to eat corn silage there would be a lot of wasted crop this fall.
Wonder if the cattle would like a top dressing of onions and carrots on their silage?
Sorry to hear about the tough weather Avia...I image the strong Canadian dollar is another punch to the gut when you are fighting it out with imported veg...

Have a happy thanksgiving and take care,

Joe
Yes it is. When the dollar is high, exporting our produce gets a little trickier. Gone are the days when the Farmer bought the seed, planted, harvested, and sold--all very simple! In this day and age not only is the Farmer the Steward of the Land, but a futures forecaster, health and safety inspector, mechanic, financial wizard, human resources manager, biology major, scientist, botanist,...did I miss anything?

Enough ranting for one day! Happy Thanksgiving to you and your family as well!!!!

Joe Dales said:
Sorry to hear about the tough weather Avia...I image the strong Canadian dollar is another punch to the gut when you are fighting it out with imported veg...
Have a happy thanksgiving and take care,
Joe

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Agriculture Headlines from Farms.com Canada East News - click on title for full story

Cattle Handling

Cattle handling is a skill that takes time to hone. The goal of handling cattle is to minimize the stress on the animal. Prolonged stress can make an animal prone to illness. Handlers have a unique appreciation for cattle; they understand the behaviour of animals, allowing them to intuitively predict animal behaviour and move them in a way that leverages the natural instincts (flight zones) of cattle, thus reducing the stress on the cattle.

Government of Canada invests nearly $2 million in migratory bird monitoring and conservation programs

Migratory birds are an important part of Canadian biodiversity. Despite their great adaptability, science shows that migratory bird populations are declining, and this has negative impacts on ecosystem health. The Government of Canada is committed to halting this loss of biodiversity by strengthening protective measures for migratory birds and supporting work with many partners, including other governments, Indigenous peoples, and non-profit organizations.

Kubota Canada Debuts the new M7-4 Diesel Tractor at the Agri-Trade Equipment Expo

Kubota Canada Debuts the new M7-4 Diesel Tractor at the Agri-Trade Equipment Expo 

John Deere updates, adds to its lineup of orchard and vineyard tractors

John Deere is widening its lineup of specialty tractors designed for work in narrow orchards and vineyards with the addition of the new 5EN and 5ML Series.

Electric Equipment: Helping Our Customers Overcome Their Biggest Challenges

By 2026, John Deere will offer electric Compact Utility Tractors, commercial and residential mowers, Gator utility vehicles, and more than 20 models of construction equipment.

© 2022   Created by Darren Marsland.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service