Ontario Agriculture

The network for agriculture in Ontario, Canada

Federal Budget: Do you want an election? Do you think anything will change with an election?

I doubt anyone really wants a federal election right now, it is hard to see that much will change politically.  Western Canada is not likely to vote Liberal, Quebec likely is not going to vote Conservative.

 

Will Ontario vote Conservative?  Are Ignatief/Liberals popular enough to gain an Minority Government?

 

Some mentioned it seems like a big waste to get another minority Conservative Government.

 

Politics Discussion - What do you think?

 

Joe Dales

 

 

Views: 153

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

If there were to be a late spring election, I would hazard to guess it would have the lowest voter turn-out EVER. Voters have been constantly threatened with an election since '06 and now are completely oblivious to political chatter.


Voters would stay home in droves.  There is little confidence in the government showing true leadership and in the same token there does not appear to be any viable alternative.


Having said that.... the people that will go to the polls and the die-hard entrenched party supporters.


Then it will rest with the die-hards with a question of supporting a party that shows contempt for our system.


The government has been boxed into a corner.  The Royal Opposition must bring down a government that is contempt.  It they do not, the opposition will send a message that contempt of our governing system is acceptable.


What a mess.   It will be a long drawn out nasty election with another minority governing party... albeit... different from the one we have today...... that is my personal opinion. :)

I agree Joann  "What a mess."

I have talked to 3 or 4 people this morning and everyone thinks it will be a big waste of time and money right now.

 

I heard $400 Million is what is it likely to cost for a Federal Election....

 

It will be interesting to see if the NDP want an election or not.

 

Take care,

 

Joe

Everyone I speak to says the same thing but there is a serious matter that needs to be addressed.

 

The sitting government is in contempt. Contempt is defined as: An act of deliberate disobedience or disregard for the laws, regulations, or decorum of a public authority, such as a court or legislative body.

Individuals may be cited for contempt when they disobey an order, fail to comply with a request, tamper with documents, withhold evidence, interrupt proceedings through their actions or words, or otherwise defy a public authority or hold it up to ridicule and disrespect.

 

It is serious and if the Royal Opposition does not deal with the matter effectively, we have a ruling party that could not be described as democratic but more as a totalitarian rule.

 

I do not think people WANT an election.... the question is: do we NEED an election with the contempt charges?

 

If the people of Canada accept contempt from our elected officials then.. by all means... we do not NEED an election.  

 

Our international reputation will suffer as a result.

 


Joe Dales said:

I agree Joann  "What a mess."

I have talked to 3 or 4 people this morning and everyone thinks it will be a big waste of time and money right now.

 

I heard $400 Million is what is it likely to cost for a Federal Election....

 

It will be interesting to see if the NDP want an election or not.

 

Take care,

 

Joe

Hi Joann,

I don't disagree with your point regarding contempt.

I have only been half watching this last political fiasco.

In the past, has every government in contempt fallen and called an election?

Just wondering about precedents and is an election a foregone conclusion irregardless of the budget?

 

Joe

 

 

From what I understand, but correct me if this is wrong.... that the contempt charges are precedent in this country.   I would imagine it will be up to the Opposition to determine what action is forecoming.  I have no idea if the G.G. would be part of this mess or not.

 

The world is watching to see what happens.  Strong leadership.... from someone please.... is needed now.  Much is at stake. 

 

If Canada shows contempt to its own citizens... are they capable of showing contempt to other nations?

 

 

 

Joe Dales said:

Hi Joann,

I don't disagree with your point regarding contempt.

I have only been half watching this last political fiasco.

In the past, has every government in contempt fallen and called an election?

Just wondering about precedents and is an election a foregone conclusion irregardless of the budget?

 

Joe

 

 

What ever you vote, you are still getting the same policys, lies and state control of your property. But in a nice way. The only difference with the policial parties is how they do it. A licence to work, licence to drive your car, licence to manage your property, requirement to pay three levels of government taxes for the same services, a Public service that treats people with comptemt, Politians with agenda of social climbing,and self interests, sell out to foreign interests and multnationals eg USA, China, and the create acts that are against the Constution.  So its your move. 
My 2cents.  I think the Conservatives will still form a minority albeit with far fewer of the popular vote behind them in rural ON.  Most farmers are disillusioned with the Western Reform Party (oops, sorry, Conservative) lack of commitment and/or outright neglect of ON agriculture (how many rural ON MP's do we have again?) and will continue on the tractor seat rather than get out and vote during spring seeding.  We do not have the rallying cry of Harper's "scrap CAIS" lie to muster us out to the polling booth this time!  Throw in some scandal/contempt issues and their sharp move to the centre and the Cons aren't much different than the Libs under Martin after all.

Joann,

I agree there is contempt by the government but I do not agree that the world is watching, in fact I do not even think that most Canadians are watching. The world cares little about Canada and I do not believe for a minute that any government any where in the world is watching our election with any real interest. I also believe Canadians have become so used to inept government that they have turned it off. That disinterest is the fault of both the Liberals and the Conservatives and to a lesser extent the NDP. The two big parties act horribly and take more interest in running the next guy down than they have of actually governing. Our political set up causes the opposition to be opposed to everything the government puts forth even when they know it is for the countries good. What a waste of time and energy. The original intent of opposition parties was to be the party that held government to account, not to oppose absolutely everything. Our present day political parties obstruct government and our ruling parties abuse their power. As far as I am concerned, I wish Harper, Iggy and Layton would all retire and that we could get some new forward thinking people in who can work together. These guys cannot be the best Canada has to offer. 

Joann said:

From what I understand, but correct me if this is wrong.... that the contempt charges are precedent in this country.   I would imagine it will be up to the Opposition to determine what action is forecoming.  I have no idea if the G.G. would be part of this mess or not.

 

The world is watching to see what happens.  Strong leadership.... from someone please.... is needed now.  Much is at stake. 

 

If Canada shows contempt to its own citizens... are they capable of showing contempt to other nations?

 

 

 

Joe Dales said:

Hi Joann,

I don't disagree with your point regarding contempt.

I have only been half watching this last political fiasco.

In the past, has every government in contempt fallen and called an election?

Just wondering about precedents and is an election a foregone conclusion irregardless of the budget?

 

Joe

 

 

I been listening to CBC, and think where have I heared this before.  Some promises to do this and do that, soon as they are in, back to screwing Mr and Mrs Voter.  Your Librials are just ex Union leaders and red rag social climbers, Conservatives gentlemen farmers that are more a home in the city, lawyers, bankers and sons of Politians, thinking they are JFK.  NDP socialist social workers who think the country in a money pit, they can play with after a dinner party with a bunch of Yuppies like a game of charades. The block well if they want to seperate, let them. They are still going to get the same Politians only in french, taxed twice as much because the fedral money will be gone. PS anyone noticed any Big Signs on crown land writen the new sight of a Policestation/ Hospital/community center lately.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Agriculture Headlines from Farms.com Canada East News - click on title for full story

Pulse Market Insight #250

Even though there are still three months left in the 2023/24 marketing year, most of the focus is on next year’s crop. Most of last year’s crop has already been sold but some farmers are still holding old-crop supplies that need to be marketed. At this time of year, the opportunities and risks for remaining old-crop supplies are magnified. The relationship between old-crop and new-crop bids is an important signal about how much risk and how much opportunity is left as the marketing year winds down. In general, a large difference between price levels means greater risk for remaining old-crop supplies. In 2023/24, prices for some pulse crops experienced extreme highs, which add to the vulnerability as the year winds down with the risk of a sharp drop outweighing the potential for higher prices. Old-crop prices for green peas are still running close to record highs at nearly $4.50 per bushel higher than the average new-crop bid. Once buyers have enough green peas to fill remaining sales

US Corn Ending Stocks Down on Greater Ethanol, Feed Demand

The USDA has trimmed its 2023-24 US corn ending stocks estimate from last month amid heavier ethanol and feed demand. In its latest monthly supply-demand estimates Thursday, the USDA pegged ending stocks at 2.122 billion bu, down 50 million from the March projection but still well above the previous year’s 1.36 billion. The USDA number was above the average pre-report trade guess of 2.109 billion, with futures trading 3-4 cents lower following the report’s noon ET release. On the demand side, corn used for ethanol was raised 25 million bu from March to 5.4 billion bu, compared to 5.176 billion in 2022-23. Feed use was bumped an identical 25 million bu higher to 6.805 billion – versus 6.558 billion last year – based on indicated disappearance during the December-February quarter. The USDA surprisingly left its 2023-24 Brazil corn production steady from last month at 124 million tonnes. Going into the report, most trader and analysts were expecting the Brazil crop to be lowered to

Map: Late Season Snow Improves Saskatchewan Runoff Conditions

Late season snowfalls at the end of March have improved spring runoff conditions in Saskatchewan, even as moisture levels in many areas of the province remain below, or well below normal levels.  In its latest spring runoff update on Friday (see map below), the Saskatchewan Water Security Agency said a mid-March snowstorm increased the expected additional runoff volumes to some degree across southern Alberta and southwestern Saskatchewan.  Much of this area across both provinces was snow free prior to the storm, the report said, adding that how quickly the snow melts will impact how much additional runoff will be experienced. With the area being so dry prior to the snowfall event, if a slow melt occurs, a lot of the water will infiltrate into the soil, it said. Another snowstorm in late March brought 5 to 15 cm of snow across most of eastern Saskatchewan, with the heavier snow falling in the northeastern portions of the grain belt.  A decent snowpack still exists in the Assiniboine

Livestock expansion unlikely until 2025, economists say

Despite some market signals that usually result in expansion, cattle and hog producers are likely to wait until at least 2025. Numbers are down for a variety of reasons in the cattle industry, says Derrell Peel, Extension livestock marketing economist with Oklahoma State University. Those factors include drought conditions throughout much of the country. “I haven’t seen anything starting despite these record high prices we’re seeing for calves,” he says. “Those price signals usually get expansion going, but it hasn’t happened yet.” Thousands of cows were culled in 2023 and going into 2024 because of drought. Producers struggled to find adequate grass to maintain the cattle inventory. “They had to make a difficult call,” Peel says. Because of the record prices last year, he says many producers sold heifers to take advantage of that income. Peel says because of that, it’s going to take longer to rebuild the herd. “Last year’s beef cow herd was the lowest we’ve seen since 1961, and

Consistency key to maintaining beef industry value

In the beef industry, consistency is key to just about everything. From sire and A.I. choices to ration options to market opportunities, producers can add value at each production stage based on their decisions. Garrett Englin, cattle buyer for JBS USA, said consistency is key for packers, too. Speaking at the 2024 Feedlot Forum in northwest Iowa, he told attendees how a current trend is helping. “Having cattle at the same size and same weight is key, and the beef-on-dairy crosses help a great deal in reaching and maintaining consistency,” he said in an Iowa State University Extension news release. “Being able to provide the same product to consumers starts with getting similar cattle from producers.” At the 2024 Feedlot Forum sponsored in part by the Iowa Beef Center and Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, Englin was asked to talk to the group about the beef-dairy cross that’s becoming very popular. A big part of how this approach works is the narrowing of genetic divers

© 2024   Created by Darren Marsland.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service