Ontario Agriculture

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Issues like this really make me shake my head. We have farmers complaining about the percentage of the food dollar that they receive, complaining about who is owning what and selling what to who, and a variety of other topics where farmers are at opposite ends of the spectrum. We grumble at each other enough that we do not need "activists" fighting us also.
So I really shake my head and give a moment of silence for another loss in the agriculture community when 80,000 students do not have the option of buying a meat product for their lunch at school.

Wayne Black

from meatingplace.com

The Baltimore City Public Schools system on Wednesday became the first in the United States to pledge to serve no meat on Mondays, according to the organization behind the campaign called Meatless Monday.

The move means 80,000 students have no meat option on Mondays. Next Monday, the menu offerings, as posted on the school district's Web site, are limited to an entrée selection of mini ravioli or grilled cheese and a side selection including mixed vegetables, mashed potatoes and fresh fruit.

In a press release, the group, an affiliate of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, said it presented Baltimore school officials its 2009 Award for Visionary Leadership in Local Food Procurement and Food Education.

"The Meatless Monday campaign, initiated in 2003 with Dr. Robert Lawrence and Dean Alfred Sommer, has become a growing international movement of individuals, organizations and communities committed to cutting out meat one day a week for their health and the health of the planet," said Sid Lerner, Chairman of the Monday Campaigns.

Meat industry advocates, however, said Baltimore students will be missing out on nutritious proteins and should at least be offered a meat option on Mondays.

"The U.S. Dietary Guidelines have affirmed time and again that meat is an important part of a balanced diet, because it contains vital amino acids and nutrients that are essential for the growing bodies of young adults," said Janet Riley, senior vice president of public affairs for the American Meat Institute, in a statement e-mailed to Meatingplace. "Additionally, for young adults who are working to maintain a healthy body weight, meat is an important part of the diet because it's nutrition-dense and helps with a feeling of satiety. We believe that students should be free to choose whether or not they wish to consume meat, instead of simply removing it from the menu and depriving them of that choice."

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Interesting article Wayne.

There are alot groups pushing their agendas to consumers....they continue to increase their power with campaigns like this.

Here was a Go Vegan propaganda brochure I found which was given to one of my kids.

There are aggressive anti meat groups out there targeting city kids with silly messages.....we better beware.

I was going through a pile of papers my high school kids had in with their homework and I saw a shocking bit of propaganda...a two sided colour handout that stated

"United Nations Report: Meat Eating is a major cause of global warming."

Click to check out the garbage these people are pushing. www.suprememastertv.com


It caught my attention and I asked them where they got it...they had not seem it and had not read it but said they got alot of paper this week at school....

I talked to them about this stuff and that people are anti farming....

We need to be aware of these people and how they see the world...they don't play fair, targeting our kids with propaganda....


Here is another gem they had on the sheet...

To Save Our Planet, we should
1. Go Vegan?
2. Drive Hybrid Vehicles?
3. Plant More Trees?
4. Change to Sustainable Energy?
5. Pray?

Answer: These plus more.
I don't understand this Wayne. These are children who are developing and learning and need proper nutrition. Something tells me the alternatives won't have the right amount of protein or iron - what is that going to do to their development? Did anyone think about that? What makes this worse - is that I bet some of these children will go home to a family that doesn't cook a proper supper - making the school the only place they get a good meal.

The school board gets a failing grade for this one - and governments had better be ready to step in and fix this - NOW.
This goes along with what the animal rights activates did in California banning layer chickens in cages. They don't care of the end result the just want to further their agenda. In California the have not made the life of a chicken any better or given themselves the ability to have a say in housing practises, they succeed in moving the industry out of the state because of the rules. Kids don't know any better of what to eat but their bodies will tell them what they need, so in the long run it is the same as not giving a kid any choclate they eventually develop a bigger sweet need than most people. I guess the key is to be able to educate them properly and they will do what is right.Also if they know what the other side is like they may love meat even more.

Andrew Campbell said:
I don't understand this Wayne. These are children who are developing and learning and need proper nutrition. Something tells me the alternatives won't have the right amount of protein or iron - what is that going to do to their development? Did anyone think about that? What makes this worse - is that I bet some of these children will go home to a family that doesn't cook a proper supper - making the school the only place they get a good meal.

The school board gets a failing grade for this one - and governments had better be ready to step in and fix this - NOW.
The American Meat Institute has stepped into the circus ring with their letter to the Chief Executive Officer of Baltimore Schools. (from meatingplace.com)
"Surely you have always offered a vegetarian option on your menu," AMI President and CEO J. Patrick Boyle wrote in a letter to Andrés A. Alonso, chief executive officer, Baltimore City Schools. "Now you are removing a meat or poultry entrée on Mondays and depriving children and their parents of the ability to determine what is appropriate for their diets and their own personal circumstances."
Boyle urged Alonso to visit the Project's series of videos at www.theMeatrix.com to better understand the organization behind the initiative.
"These videos seek to manipulate and mislead children through a cleverly produced, but factually inaccurate cartoon takeoff of the film 'The Matrix'," wrote Boyle. "Ultimately, the group seeks an end to the United States' efficient and advanced food production system that delivers to Americans the most abundant and affordable food supply in the world.
"I am confident that you are concerned not just about the education of your students, but also about their health and nutrition status. I urge you to reconsider this decision and allow children every day that they attend school to access the most nutrient dense food available: meat and poultry products. Your children, in particular, deserve this choice," Boyle concluded.


In the Baltimore Public School system three out of four students are eligible for free and reduced meals and school meals may be the only significant source of meat and poultry in their diets. So Andrew hit it on the head when stating it may be the only chance for students to get a proper meal.

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