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Careers in Agriculture Are NOT Attractive to most consumers. Will this hurt our ability to hire non farm employees?

Careers In Agriculture Are Rewarding, Says FCC

Recent FCC survey results about potential careers in agriculture paint a challenging picture of the industry.

Canadian consumers who took the survey chose “weather-dependent,” “struggling,” “under-recognized,” “underpaid” and “essential” when asked to choose the top five words from a list associated with the agriculture industry. Producers surveyed chose nearly identical words.

“It’s obvious that both farmers and consumers recognize that there are challenges associated with agriculture,” says FCC President and CEO Greg Stewart. “It’s surprising that the words chosen did not focus on opportunities. There are so many success stories in agriculture and related industries that counter this perception.”

At the same time, a national FCC Vision Panel survey showed that optimism among producers remains high. Results show that 80% of producers would recommend a career in agriculture to a family member or friend. On the other hand, only 21% of consumers would consider a career in agriculture, and 27% would encourage someone else to pursue it. Although farmers recognize the challenges inherent in the industry, they still would encourage others to get involved in it.

From growing crops to processing and exporting, agriculture includes areas such as food, technology, health, energy and the environment, and employs one in eight Canadians.

“Agriculture matters. It’s a major Canadian industry and a noble career option,” says Stewart. “It’s amazing to know you’re part of something big. Right here in Canada, producers positively affect people on the other side of the world. We hear that from customers every day. We need to share this information with consumers and young people who are making important career choices.”

FCC is deeply committed to the success of Canadian agriculture and is working to educate the public about its potential and possibilities.

Source: Farm Credit Canada

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Check out the data slides on the link.

I am very concerned about Agriculture's ability to attract smart employees in the future when there are so few farm kids left.

Does anyone else have an opinion.

Joe Dales

I agree, I think it is very interesting how there is a high unemployment rate, especially in the US, and yet some companies/farms are having a hard time finding employees. It just means that there are not enough people taking agriculture programs in college and university. We need to find a way to encourage young people to consider all of these diverse opportunities!

Carolyn Lee

Here is video on this topic we covered a few years ago.

 

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