Ontario Agriculture

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I was wondering how people felt about the closing of this local TV station?

Any memories?

Thanks,

Kevin

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Hi Kevin:

I grew up with only one channel....CKNX TV channel 8.
It was the only station until we had cable introduced sometime in the 70's I recall.

CKNX had hockey night in Canada in those years and you never missed that on Saturday nights.

Thanks CKNX.

Joe
There was some concern from various people that the local news would not be heard. In today's society where policy is perceived to be developed based on what is in the news media, local policy could be hampered since there is no local media other than small town localized print media and radio. With more urban based media reporting, the rural issues could be skewed incorrectly or completely missed.
CKNX offered a great media outlet for local residents in the surrounding counties. CKNX farm news was on the top list of things to watch and listen to. A respected farm news broadcaster from CKNX is even in the Ontario Agriculture Hall of Fame. A few people who have worked at CKNX TV have moved on to develop great ideas.
As Joe pointed out - Saturday night hockey games were a must.
But with new technology and the increased (perceived) need to increase in size for economies of scale, local TV has lost the respect from some residents. Society is more interested in what dress Michelle Obama is wearing than the fact the neighbour a mile away lost their heirlooms in a theft.
Changing of the times, changing of the guard. Make the best of it and remember the great things (and people) that have come out of the CKNX building near the top of the hill.
I still remember touring the station in public school and sitting in the chair that Bryan Allen sat in for many years. I do not recall the name of the sports guy.
Thanks a bunch CKNX for the memories.
The sports guy you're likely refering to Wayne is Fred Burton.
Local news did not make CKNX unique. Community newspapers will continue to do a fine job covering that. What made this station so special was the people they attracted to become farm directors. These guys became celebrities in a unique way, Bob Carbert, Rodger Schwass, Cliff Robb and Murray Guant to name just a few. The unique brand each developed and their trusted work is what we miss today.

Wayne Black said:
There was some concern from various people that the local news would not be heard. In today's society where policy is perceived to be developed based on what is in the news media, local policy could be hampered since there is no local media other than small town localized print media and radio. With more urban based media reporting, the rural issues could be skewed incorrectly or completely missed.
CKNX offered a great media outlet for local residents in the surrounding counties. CKNX farm news was on the top list of things to watch and listen to. A respected farm news broadcaster from CKNX is even in the Ontario Agriculture Hall of Fame. A few people who have worked at CKNX TV have moved on to develop great ideas.
As Joe pointed out - Saturday night hockey games were a must.
But with new technology and the increased (perceived) need to increase in size for economies of scale, local TV has lost the respect from some residents. Society is more interested in what dress Michelle Obama is wearing than the fact the neighbour a mile away lost their heirlooms in a theft.
Changing of the times, changing of the guard. Make the best of it and remember the great things (and people) that have come out of the CKNX building near the top of the hill.
I still remember touring the station in public school and sitting in the chair that Bryan Allen sat in for many years. I do not recall the name of the sports guy.
Thanks a bunch CKNX for the memories.

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