Ontario Agriculture

The network for agriculture in Ontario, Canada

Grassroots producers have worked at trying to put forward a Recovery Plan for the Ontario Pork Industry. It is an article for discussion and is not written in stone. Please consider engaging in discussions - tell us what statements you can endorse and give us suggestions for those statements you can not support.

Only through these discussions, can we provide the unified voice that is needed.

'If you aren't a part of the solution - you become part of the problem'

Views: 97

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

The U.S. country of origin labeling and interprovincial trade disruption are the biggest issues that stand in the way of a level playingfield.
There are numerous issues but,

The only sustainable solution will be to get the pork prices up...now the dollar is moving to par with the US.

What can we do to address prices?
If we believe the reason why our price is where it is - too many hogs in this world economy - markets are telling us we have to downsize. A problem is that some of us will get that message quicker (due to limited funds) than others (US) who think they can sustain this crazy marketplace - dog-eat-dog. The question that needs to be asked - Do the MAJORITY of Ontario Producers want to work together to systemically downsize our industry - AND - put pursue legislation to protect that downsizing - as we watch 200,000 MT (and growing) US pork coming into our store. You are right about the rising dollar - and we can add that to the growing list of items working against us - and the question is - when do we see any sustainable resolution to any one of these problems? We all bought into 'Fresh Pork for the World' and now the world has changed it's mind (perhaps temporarily). Producers need to unite as one voice - and list the priorities of what they want - suggestions: Cost of Production Insurance; Fix CAIS; eliminate the damage of ASRA to Ontario Producers (via $$$ to producers) put regulations in place to ensure imports are produced to our exact standards - the list is endless - so we as producers HAVE got to set a priority list - and I would say address the short-term; intermediate and long-term industry. I'd be interested to get your feedback.
Will the packers come on board?? There will still be an export demand as the economy rebounds and some people and packers will still want to chase that. The pork that we are raising now is disappearing just not at a price that we like, who is really controlling the price?? Yes I believe we need to control our own market and supply it ourselves and do it sooner than later, we just need OP to realize this and step up

JoAnne Caughill said:
If we believe the reason why our price is where it is - too many hogs in this world economy - markets are telling us we have to downsize. A problem is that some of us will get that message quicker (due to limited funds) than others (US) who think they can sustain this crazy marketplace - dog-eat-dog. The question that needs to be asked - Do the MAJORITY of Ontario Producers want to work together to systemically downsize our industry - AND - put pursue legislation to protect that downsizing - as we watch 200,000 MT (and growing) US pork coming into our store. You are right about the rising dollar - and we can add that to the growing list of items working against us - and the question is - when do we see any sustainable resolution to any one of these problems? We all bought into 'Fresh Pork for the World' and now the world has changed it's mind (perhaps temporarily). Producers need to unite as one voice - and list the priorities of what they want - suggestions: Cost of Production Insurance; Fix CAIS; eliminate the damage of ASRA to Ontario Producers (via $$$ to producers) put regulations in place to ensure imports are produced to our exact standards - the list is endless - so we as producers HAVE got to set a priority list - and I would say address the short-term; intermediate and long-term industry. I'd be interested to get your feedback.
Hi Tom - Packers are hearing about the Recovery Plan - and intrigued. They understand that without us, they don't have an industry. They know we need more of the Retail Dollar and I would also go out on a limb and say that they too likely need more of the retail dollar. Processors have been squeezed with us. A round table of Industry people will be an important part of this process of moving forward with a Recovery Plan. Tom - John N. and I would really like the opportunity to speak to your County Meeting - any chance of this?

Tom Murray said:
Will the packers come on board?? There will still be an export demand as the economy rebounds and some people and packers will still want to chase that. The pork that we are raising now is disappearing just not at a price that we like, who is really controlling the price?? Yes I believe we need to control our own market and supply it ourselves and do it sooner than later, we just need OP to realize this and step up

JoAnne Caughill said:
If we believe the reason why our price is where it is - too many hogs in this world economy - markets are telling us we have to downsize. A problem is that some of us will get that message quicker (due to limited funds) than others (US) who think they can sustain this crazy marketplace - dog-eat-dog. The question that needs to be asked - Do the MAJORITY of Ontario Producers want to work together to systemically downsize our industry - AND - put pursue legislation to protect that downsizing - as we watch 200,000 MT (and growing) US pork coming into our store. You are right about the rising dollar - and we can add that to the growing list of items working against us - and the question is - when do we see any sustainable resolution to any one of these problems? We all bought into 'Fresh Pork for the World' and now the world has changed it's mind (perhaps temporarily). Producers need to unite as one voice - and list the priorities of what they want - suggestions: Cost of Production Insurance; Fix CAIS; eliminate the damage of ASRA to Ontario Producers (via $$$ to producers) put regulations in place to ensure imports are produced to our exact standards - the list is endless - so we as producers HAVE got to set a priority list - and I would say address the short-term; intermediate and long-term industry. I'd be interested to get your feedback.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Agriculture Headlines from Farms.com Canada East News - click on title for full story

Saskatchewan Crop Conditions Up from a Year Ago

The first Saskatchewan crop condition ratings for the 2024 growing season are mostly up from a year ago, although the scope of improvement is variable. The weekly provincial crop report on Thursday pegged this year’s spring wheat crop at 87% good to excellent as of Monday, up a relatively modest 6 points from a year earlier, while the oat and barley ratings were 2 and 5 points higher, respectively, at 87% good to excellent for both. At 78% good to excellent, the condition of the canola crop was just a single point above a year ago. On the other hand, the condition of the durum crop was rated 93% good to excellent as of Monday, an increase of 21 points from a year ago, while the lentil crop was 15 points better at 90% and the chickpea crop a major 31 points higher at 95%. Gains for other crops fell somewhere in between. At 91% good to excellent, the condition of the flax crop was up 8 points on the year, with mustard up 14 points to 88%, and peas up 9 points to 91%. The canary cro

New Grading Changes Coming for the 2024-25 Crop Year

The Canadian Grain Commission has announced new grading changes for the upcoming 2024-25 crop year that it says will better meet the needs of the grain sector in Canada and grain buyers around the world. Among the changes are new variety designation lists for food barley, and updates to the assessment of seed coat discolouration in soybeans. According to a CGC release, food barley varieties are unique and different from malting or feed barley varieties due to the distinct quality features desired for food, such as high beta-glucans. And to ensure Canadian producers and the agriculture sector can realize the benefits of developing and growing these varieties, the CGC is creating variety designation lists for Barley, Canada Eastern Food, which will take effect on July 1, 2024, and Barley, Canada Western Food, which will take effect on Aug. 1, 2024. Meanwhile, as part of the CGC grain grading modernization project, the official Grain Grading Guide will be updated to clarify the asse

Alberta Seeding Complete; Crop Emergence on Track with Average

The final push was delayed by rain in some parts of the province last week, but Alberta seeding is virtually now complete.  Friday’s crop showed the planting of Alberta major crops (spring wheat, oats, barley, canola, and peas) at 99.6% complete as of Tuesday, up a few points from a week earlier and in line with the five- and 10-year averages of 99.4% and 98.7%.  The report said final seeding efforts in the Central, North East, and North West regions were slowed by rain that was accompanied by persistent strong winds that led to an overall reduction in surface soil moisture in all areas but the Peace Region.   Regardless, crop growth is off to a good start, with the South Region in need of timely rains while the rest of the province needs warmer temperatures, the report said.  The emergence of major crops across the province is reported at 86%, which matches both the 5- and 10-year averages. Regionally, emergence of major crops is behind the historical average in the South and Nort

Automation, robotics helping farmers strengthen food security

B.C. farmers are accessing new technology through federal and provincial government funding to grow their businesses and increase production to help strengthen food security in the province.

© 2024   Created by Darren Marsland.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service