Ontario Agriculture

The network for agriculture in Ontario, Canada

AALP Class 16 Plunges into Conflict Resolution at Seminar 7

The seventh seminar stop on the AALP Class 16 leadership journey took place from January 15 to 17th 2017 at the Crowne Plaza hotel in Niagara Falls. Located on the bustling Fallsview Avenue, the hotel overlooked the breathtaking Canadian and American Falls, and provided a great setting for the full seminar agenda.


Julie Westeinde, from Breakthrough Learning Associates in Ottawa, led the group of twenty-six participants through an all-day workshop on conflict resolution that included role plays, group discussions, individual reflection, and the implementation of a new communication model entitled “OFNR.” This acronym “OFNR” stands for Observation, Feeling, Need, and Request, and uses four steps to calmly navigate a breakdown in communication between two parties. By sharing thoughts through factual “observations,” then declaring “feelings” whether good or bad, followed by articulating what you “need” from the other person, and then delivering a clear and concise “request,” these four steps can effectively diffuse conflict.


AALP Class 16 also had the opportunity to “tiptoe through the tulips” at the large family-owned floral greenhouse operation – Pioneer Flower Farms Limited – in Jordan, Ontario, to see budding varieties of tulips, lilies, and other flower varieties being grown, packaged, and shipped to retail stores all over North America. This family business started in 1971 and has grown to employ over 100 local and off-shore workers.


This seminar marked the conclusion of the year-long independent group study Issues Analysis Projects with formal presentations to the industry stakeholders, who submitted request for proposals for consulting work fifteen months ago. The presentations were a huge success and the six consulting teams shared the main highlights from their projects, as well as their key learnings from working with a unique group of people over the course of the year. Thank you once again to everyone involved in the AALP Issues Analysis Projects for Class 16.


The seminar also included a number of orientation sessions geared at preparing the group for the upcoming International Study Tour. Stay tuned for the upcoming blog posts on the Rural Ontario Institute website beginning February 14th 2017 as AALP Class 16 departs for their tour of the scenic and historically rich countries of Vietnam and Thailand.

Views: 155

Comment

You need to be a member of Ontario Agriculture to add comments!

Join Ontario Agriculture

Agriculture Headlines from Farms.com Canada East News - click on title for full story

Cattle Numbers Lowest In Decades

According to a Statistic Canada report, there were 11.1 million cattle and calves on farms, down more than 2 percent from the previous year and the lowest number since 1989. In Alberta, there were 4.7 million head on all beef cattle operations as of January 1st. That's down 85 thousand from a year ago. Cow/calf operations were up 18 thousand head year over year to around 2.6 million, while the drop came in feeder and stocker operations which were down over 157 thousand head to 956 thousand. Drought conditions and tight feed supplies, coupled with good prices, resulted in more breeding stock heading to market. Producers held 0.7 percent fewer feeder heifers and three percent fewer calves compared to a year ago. Average warm carcass weight increased 18 percent over the past 25 years, which helped offset the decline in beef production. The Stats-Can report also took a glance at other livestock on-farm. Canadian hog producers reported 13.8 million hogs on their farms on January 1st., dow

WHEN DO I TURN OUT MY COWS? MANAGING SPRING PASTURES DURING AND AFTER DROUGHT

Beef producers will soon be making grazing plans for turning their herds out to spring pastures. While drought planning should be a routine part of the development of short- and long-term grazing plans, many beef cattle herds have withstood successive years of drought. This has prompted producers to hone in on their management skills to make the best use of their pasture forage and carefully maintain carryover to prevent prolonged damage. The question of ‘when can I turn my cows out?’ is an important one, especially for those with dwindling hays stacks or for producers purchasing feed.   Dr. Edward Bork is a Professor of Rangeland Management in the faculty of Agricultural, Life, and Environmental Sciences at the University of Alberta. He says that, aside from spring rainfall, how your pastures looked when you brought cattle in last fall may be the best indicator of how they will perform in spring. “The better condition the pasture was in October, the faster it will recover,” Bork expl

JPD Angus Wins 2024 Mapleseed Pasture Award

The Beef Farmers of Ontario, Mapleseed and the Ontario Forage Council, sponsors of the Ontario Mapleseed Pasture Award, have announced that the Chalmers family of JPD Angus of Oro-Medonte in Simcoe County are the recipients of the 2024 Mapleseed Pasture Award

Minister MacAulay promotes Canada’s world-class products in Malaysia and the Philippines

This week, the Honourable Lawrence MacAulay, Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, visited Malaysia and the Philippines to strengthen regional partnerships and create new opportunities for our hardworking Canadian producers.

Expansion of the emerald ash borer regulated area in Québec

As part of its commitment to protect Canada’s plant resource base from pests, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has put in place measures intended to protect Canada's economy by preventing the spread of emerald ash borer (EAB) to non-infested areas of Canada. The CFIA has updated its regulated areas for EAB to include additional Regional County Municipalities (RCM) in Québec. This expansion is due to detections of EAB in 2022 and 2023 in Québec.

© 2024   Created by Darren Marsland.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service