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Anyone started grain corn? How is the moisture, yields and test weights?

Just wondering how everyone is doing....

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Testing corn here in Burford... Still 30-32% generally. Some has come off in south eastern Brant @ 26-29% No one going full stream yet. Getting anxious....Larry
we took some off at 32% with a decent yeild and have tried some for another guy around 44%. I guess chistmas is coming maybe it will dry down by then.
Brent
Yes have started ,one field done 32% moisture ,200 bu wet 156 bu dry hoping it will dry down some day.
when did this corn get planted and what is your location.
we hope to finish beans this week and than go corn................
Started here Londonish- last week. Planted last week of April. Moisture is in the 30% range and the yield seems to be around 190 bu/ac
Tested 5 different fields in Waterloo and Wellington counties. Moisture ranged from 31 to 35%.
North of Belleville, started today. Some conventional non-BT corn that may not stand up if we get the snow we're supposed to get this weekend so we're going with it. May just keep on going if the forecast doesn't look much better when this field is done. Running about 27%, about 160 bushels wet which on a dry equivalent is about 10% higher than average so better than expected so far.

Forecast - SIGH - http://home.madoccoop.com/index.cfm?show=1&map=CityWeather
My corn planted - May 9th. Moisture - 33.5%. Grade - 4. Starting into a field systematically drained later today or Thursday if it starts to rain again. Yield "looks" decent thus far (no actual yet so i will not speculate).
Most corn delivered to the local elevator is coming in at 28-34% and Grade 4. Very little at Grade 3. Another local elevator is receiving corn at Grade 3 and little at Grade 2 - I can not confirm which one yet.
Pretty discouraging when you deliver a load that nets out at 13.99 ton and yields out at 10.6 ton after moisture shrink & dockage.

rein minnema said:
when did this corn get planted and what is your location.
we hope to finish beans this week and than go corn................
Next question is.............. and where does this #3 and #4 corn fit in to the market????
Casco/ Ethanoland the livestockfeed market???
Final numbers:
half of the field - 146 bu/ac (not drained).
Other half - 156 bu/ac (systematically drained at 40')
same hybrid and previous crops. 1/3 went Grade 3; 2/3 - Grade 4.

Wayne Black said:
My corn planted - May 9th. Moisture - 33.5%. Grade - 4. Starting into a field systematically drained later today or Thursday if it starts to rain again. Yield "looks" decent thus far (no actual yet so i will not speculate).
Most corn delivered to the local elevator is coming in at 28-34% and Grade 4. Very little at Grade 3. Another local elevator is receiving corn at Grade 3 and little at Grade 2 - I can not confirm which one yet.
Pretty discouraging when you deliver a load that nets out at 13.99 ton and yields out at 10.6 ton after moisture shrink & dockage.

rein minnema said:
when did this corn get planted and what is your location.
we hope to finish beans this week and than go corn................
I am travelling in western New York state this weekend...Buffalo to Rochester area

Looks like half of the corn has been harvested.
Still the odd soybean field to finish combining.
Does not look like they were able to plant much winter wheat either.

Joe Dales
Hoping to finish our last 80 acres of beans in the next 2-3 days. Corn yesterday was down around 22%, mostly grade 2, still have a couple of fields around 35% but we need some HM anyway. Still seems to be running well above average for yield.

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