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What I have read on this site is nothing but small fry and sugar coated issues. Your government both fedral and provincial, have policy of providing jobs, keeping the plebs happy and renvue raising. It is no different to any other welfare dependant state, and country. But things have changed in the world, as the current recession has shown. No renvue or poor commodity prices leave a government open to black mail and one way oppertunities from overseas countries (China for one) and multinationals companies. This what has happen in Australia, example 1972 we sent our wheat board officials to deal with China, to sell wheat. They arrived at the hotel and armed guards were place at their door and chineses said you will except this price and you will not leave until it is signied. These are the people you are dealing with. Australia once exported to China now they own our mines, smelters, 70 of the work done here is now been done in China. They have started to send their own workers out to run the mines now. They have bought up our meat works and now starting to dictate foreign policies by blackmailing not to take our resources. Australia was brorrowing 60 million dollars a week from China last year. They had our new defence policy before our politions had write it. The Australian government have allowed them to dig up the most prime and productive farming land in Australia for coal. This what happens in the real world. But I am been racist. So before you say this is a conspiorsy theroy. Think twice who is writing your policys, a foriegn country, promosing to provide jobs and money. Ps your timber industry is up for grabs. Wait and see.

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Interesting points...I don't think the timber industry is one to worry about....food, energy and raw materials for manufacturing are likely the areas that they need to secure for their own people first....Canada has lived beside the US for a while so we are familiar with sleeping with a super power. China and India are going to take a greater position on the world stage over the next 50 years...I agree that we should be thinking about policies that protect our gifts...natural resources and our people.

Good discussions.
I don't think that anyone should be labeled "racist" for making some factual observations. Although some of your comments would need to be verified, in general they certainly deserve careful consideration.

China is a superpower in the making and will undoubtedly act in the best interests of their humongous population. They cannot afford to have discontent among their people and will accordingly act in whatever way necessary. We have all the space and resources that they need.

That's gotta be darned attractive.
In fact they are snopping around in the Yukon, it was report they are after gold.

John said:
I don't think that anyone should be labeled "racist" for making some factual observations. Although some of your comments would need to be verified, in general they certainly deserve careful consideration.

China is a superpower in the making and will undoubtedly act in the best interests of their humongous population. They cannot afford to have discontent among their people and will accordingly act in whatever way necessary. We have all the space and resources that they need.

That's gotta be darned attractive.
don't know about the tunston story. But the Yukon government were entantaining a Chinese deligation last year seeking to expore for minerals. Now gone very hush hush.

Joann said:
maybe they need to restock with "real" gold bars?

tungsten is worth roughly $10 /pound.

"In October, the Hong Kong bankers discovered some gold bars shipped from the United States were actually tungsten with gold plating."

http://www.financialsense.com/fsu/editorials/willie/2009/1118.html

any truth to the story?
Bristow said:
In fact they are snopping around in the Yukon, it was report they are after gold.
This could be an issue that we should be concerned about since not only is Canada rich in resources but we are also open to foreign trade deals instead of a protectionist state. I find it kind of odd the theory is coming from Australia since in 2006 an inquiry found that the Australian Wheat Board (AWB) was the centre of an inquiry into the UN's Oil-for-Food program in Iraq. A quote from from December 2006 "A United Nations inquiry found that numerous aspects of the AWB/Alia relationship should have signalled AWB that the cash was going to the Baghdad offices of Saddam Hussein. The inquiry also found that AWB was the biggest single source of illicit funds collected by the regime." This ended up having Australian wheat being discounted in 2007 because of their less than professional dealings with the UN's program.
Also, consistent with the theory listed above, in an interview on Monday (Jan. 11th) afternoon the following was suggested as a geographical area to invest in agriculture: "Brazil and certain areas in South East Asia such as Malaysia and Indonesia. The next growth area, one that the world must turn to, is tropical Africa". Wage and energy costs are too high in Canada for foreign investors to buy up our farmland.
Finally there was a lot of issues going on in 1972 that we now know in hindsight should never have happened. One of those was the wheat robbery of 1972 that involved Russia and Canadian wheat.
China is just being aggressive in obtaining the necessities that they want. If we do not want to lose our companies to foreign ownership - pay up!
There is an interesting article on China's Economy in the Economist.

Here is the link:

http://www.economist.com/displayStory.cfm?story_id=15270708&sou...

The Chinese government has also been reported to be buying vast tracks of farm land in Africa and other 3rd world countries because it is relatively cheap and is a good insurance against food shortages...
In regards to your farm land it is very cheap, from Australian view, you have a northern region that will become open very soon NW passage. And those pine trees look very inviting to passing ships as wood chip. Hearst is being hit very hard with the recession and land very cheap. Its not very hard to find plebs to work for a few dollars less when they have bills to pay. And your politions that are friendly to foreign investment, for votes, soon change their mines about enviroment issues. The first you will here about is after it is sign sealed and delivered on the 6pm news.

Wayne Black said:
This could be an issue that we should be concerned about since not only is Canada rich in resources but we are also open to foreign trade deals instead of a protectionist state. I find it kind of odd the theory is coming from Australia since in 2006 an inquiry found that the Australian Wheat Board (AWB) was the centre of an inquiry into the UN's Oil-for-Food program in Iraq. A quote from from December 2006 "A United Nations inquiry found that numerous aspects of the AWB/Alia relationship should have signalled AWB that the cash was going to the Baghdad offices of Saddam Hussein. The inquiry also found that AWB was the biggest single source of illicit funds collected by the regime." This ended up having Australian wheat being discounted in 2007 because of their less than professional dealings with the UN's program.
Also, consistent with the theory listed above, in an interview on Monday (Jan. 11th) afternoon the following was suggested as a geographical area to invest in agriculture: "Brazil and certain areas in South East Asia such as Malaysia and Indonesia. The next growth area, one that the world must turn to, is tropical Africa". Wage and energy costs are too high in Canada for foreign investors to buy up our farmland.
Finally there was a lot of issues going on in 1972 that we now know in hindsight should never have happened. One of those was the wheat robbery of 1972 that involved Russia and Canadian wheat.
China is just being aggressive in obtaining the necessities that they want. If we do not want to lose our companies to foreign ownership - pay up!

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