Ontario Agriculture

The network for agriculture in Ontario, Canada

Here's an idea for enterprizing people.  We all know that most of our imported items come from China, have killed our primary and secondary industary. In the main it has been through government regulation and cheap labour.  In the end a industry is destoryed and the imported product rises in price, because of no competion. This where you come in. Idenfy that product and sell local. Find those products that people want that you know you can make cheap.  I have found if you go to Walmart, Canadian Tire and any other big store even dollar dazzlars. You can find products, you can make yourself.  Here's a few Soap, chemicals, pesticides, pet products, potting mix, bio disel, paper fire bricks, candles,leathers, brush for fences and pine oils, boxes, paper bricks for building. Do them yourself and market them yourself. You have the internet use it. Find what is lacking and fill it.

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I am not sure if this is practical.

Aren't you better off doing a good job on a few things and be happy you buy some of these things cheaply.

 

Some of the farmers are doing and many more things mentioned above in Australia to supplement income. and I guess it maybe very shallow, that Canadian farmers are not doing the same. But I thought, I would mention the idea, to remind farmers with monoculture farm, finding harder to get returns.

Hi Bristow,

I think you have a good idea on trying to capture additional value.

 

While everyone is different, investing some time and energy on new business development is a sound strategy...especially if it takes away some of the risk with monoculture....

 

Some of our pork producer friends here in Ontario are taking their pork and marketing it directly to consumers with some really innovative marketing approaches to capture additional value.

 

One of our my other friends is developing some additional services that utilize his time and equipment in the winter months that will generate additional revenue.

 

Good ideas  and very innovative.

Take care,

Joe Dales

 

 

 

Here is a clip on some profitability strategies from the Top Managers team.

Hope this helps,

Kevin

 

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