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What Was The Ontario Agriculture Top News Story Of The Year? Any suggestions?

In 2010 What Ontario Agriculture Top News Story was the biggest and most impactful in the province?

 

Here are some of my thoughts?

 

Tremendous Financial Challenges Faced By the Pork and Beef Producers in Ontario.

 

Excellent Crop Production Year in Ontario - Yields and Strong Prices.

 

The New Role and Restructuring of Ontario Pork.

 

Ontario Land Prices Continue to Increase.

 

 

 

These are some of my thoughts looking back, what other topics do you have?

 

Thanks and Happy New Year,

 

Joe Dales

Farms.com

joe.dales@farms.com

877 438-5729 x5013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I would suggest that one of the most interesting stories of 2010 was how many Ontario producers continued to shun basic  and fundamental business principles.  Examples include wilfully selling into local markets that were clearly uncompetitive to our major trading and global competitors, buying or renting land at P/E ratios that are well north of "bubble" territory, and continuing to operate as if they can borrow their way to prosperity judging by the latest StatsCan reports.  Will be of further interest to see how all sectors of the industry react when we return to below COP returns within the next 12 - 18 months as many pundits are suggesting.

Just my 2cents.

Government interventions have historically had a way of insulating producers from the realities of market forces that conflict with personal choices. So your thoughts are interesting, Steve, but no new story here! Remember the infamous Farm Debt Review Board of the 80's?

Albert Einstein is quoted to saying "We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them".

 

Then by all means, I would suggest you are both righ. 

 

Our government has managed to further erode farmers' rights in Ontario but have not released our obligations to the public.   ......in other words..... our provincial government is incapable of solving our agricultural problems as they are the very people that lead us to this point.

 

Woe is us.

 

John Schwartzentruber said:

Government interventions have historically had a way of insulating producers from the realities of market forces that conflict with personal choices. So your thoughts are interesting, Steve, but no new story here! Remember the infamous Farm Debt Review Board of the 80's?

Hi Steve, John and Joann

Good thoughts...what does the future hold...what should we do....

 

One of my New Year's Resolution is to keep improving our business fundamentals and not make too many expensive mistakes....

 

I like to follow something that I heard a keynote speaker say called the Ant Philosophy.

 

Think Winter, All Summer   (Prepare when times are good)

and

Think Summer, All Winter   (Be Optimist when times are tough)

 

Take care and see you soon,

 

Joe Dales

 

I lean towards Dr. Spencer Johnson's thoughts in "Who Moved my Cheese".

 

and I truly believe the farmers' cheese is about to be moved in a big way in Ontario.

 

take care

 

joann

 

OntAG Admin said:

Hi Steve, John and Joann

Good thoughts...what does the future hold...what should we do....

 

One of my New Year's Resolution is to keep improving our business fundamentals and not make too many expensive mistakes....

 

I like to follow something that I heard a keynote speaker say called the Ant Philosophy.

 

Think Winter, All Summer   (Prepare when times are good)

and

Think Summer, All Winter   (Be Optimist when times are tough)

 

Take care and see you soon,

 

Joe Dales

 

I think the story could be the large swings in commodity prices....in June the experts were warning about $2.50/bu corn and now they are talking about $7 corn...Crazy markets is my vote.
i agree with you joe that crop price and yeild is the story. never have we been in the news more and because food prices never came down after the wheat spike in 2007-2008 we don't have all the noise about ethanol being bad for society.Never in my life in agriculture have i seen good yeilds and good prices in all main commodities of corn soys canola and wheat. pork buy out program allowed many to get out with dignity and equity intact. and teeth in not being able to refill barns for three years will allow even the pork industry to recover

Thanks John,

I heard the crops did well up there.

What kind of yields on corn and soy?

Talk to you soon.

Joe

You must have memorized all 180 sayings

 

Joann said:

Albert Einstein is quoted to saying "We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them".

 

Then by all means, I would suggest you are both righ. 

 

Our government has managed to further erode farmers' rights in Ontario but have not released our obligations to the public.   ......in other words..... our provincial government is incapable of solving our agricultural problems as they are the very people that lead us to this point.

 

Woe is us.

 

John Schwartzentruber said:

Government interventions have historically had a way of insulating producers from the realities of market forces that conflict with personal choices. So your thoughts are interesting, Steve, but no new story here! Remember the infamous Farm Debt Review Board of the 80's?

No.

 

I just happen to like people such as Einstein and especially Hawking.

 

 

 

bert said:

You must have memorized all 180 sayings

 

Joann said:

Albert Einstein is quoted to saying "We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them".

 

Then by all means, I would suggest you are both righ. 

 

Our government has managed to further erode farmers' rights in Ontario but have not released our obligations to the public.   ......in other words..... our provincial government is incapable of solving our agricultural problems as they are the very people that lead us to this point.

 

Woe is us.

 

John Schwartzentruber said:

Government interventions have historically had a way of insulating producers from the realities of market forces that conflict with personal choices. So your thoughts are interesting, Steve, but no new story here! Remember the infamous Farm Debt Review Board of the 80's?
I would say Carbon tax mark two, this time by the proviencal means, as a poss to fedral acts.  The rock spiders are planning it already. 

Steve, I think the wild land prices and rents will be the story in 2011 with these crop prices and everyone tripping over themselves to get a bigger piece of the gold rush...

 

 

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