Ontario Agriculture

The network for agriculture in Ontario, Canada

Northern Ontario we have never seen him here, yet he represents, our interests? pay for his government, we have one poor rep that trys to cover an area the size of France. Have resources that are raped, wasted and get told that farm land will be locked away to save some rain deer. Forgod sake.  Just simple government services, like getting a licence, my photo licence will take 5 weeks to recieve, inquire about where my bountry ends and starts two months so far after paying $50 bucks plus GST. We get a fedral government public servant visit on a Wednesday twice a month and gain you have to wait weeks to get a answer or result. I believe a certain country once went to war, with the cry no taxation without representation, ring a bell.

 

I saw a model farm today at Kasapusking the beef research center, a thousand areas of pirma farming land yet saw no cows? Told they just test the quality of the meat there, saw at least 20 cars, which I gathered were government employees. Yet you travel from there to Hearst a distance of 100 Kms and saw two old dairy cows drink out of a ditch on a hobbyfarm.  A part from Hobbyfarms, old farm derolic houses, and farmland that was once prosperess laid to waste.  I went on the net to find more information about the facility found nothing, yet a fantasic building the ag department has in Guelph. How many other facilities that house armies of public servants and scientist around the proverance that do research, with no direct benefit to the farmer, yet have a government that has agenga of sell the farm to foreign interest at tax payer expense in the form of GST on food.

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I don't think too many others would disagree with you....agriculture is a lower priority on both the federal and provincial government's agenda...

As far as government employees at facilities....I think if you asked...there are alot few government agri people on the ground as the ag budgets keep getting tightened downwards.

Northern Ontario has vast potential but it will be market/business development opportunities that will help it achieve growth and prosperity...not help from the government.

Joe
In reference to the North you are right and I agree totally. Yet they take our taxes and demand we follow envorimental laws, that are totally inquate locking up crown land in National parks.

Joe Dales said:
I don't think too many others would disagree with you....agriculture is a lower priority on both the federal and provincial government's agenda...

As far as government employees at facilities....I think if you asked...there are alot few government agri people on the ground as the ag budgets keep getting tightened downwards.

Northern Ontario has vast potential but it will be market/business development opportunities that will help it achieve growth and prosperity...not help from the government.

Joe
Hey Bristow:

Why don't you run for the Federal Liberal Leadership and you could kick some butt.....I saw Ignatieff's popularity is the lowest of the party leaders....

RR
We got the same rabble in Australia running the country, retard ideas with no idea of the mess they course,and short term policies, three quarters of the money disppears before it get to the project in admin. I thought when I came here they would have a bit of nowse. I guess thats why they have g20 meetings, to exchange ideas how we going to screw Mr Plebe this week. Bought a car you can't get insurance for, yet it is deemed road worthy, only want third party the insurance companies quoted me $4,700 cheapest 3,000 for 12months. The thing cost me 2,000, you cross the border in Quebec $400 and the government, runs their third party scheme. But this government tells you private competion is a good thing. O well thats my rant for tonight starting to sound like a pom.

Roadrunner said:
Hey Bristow:

Why don't you run for the Federal Liberal Leadership and you could kick some butt.....I saw Ignatieff's popularity is the lowest of the party leaders....

RR

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