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Gus Ternoey
  • Tilbury, ON
  • Canada
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Gus Ternoey's Blog

Thinking GMO

As great as the benefits are for Golden Rice, with the potential to save 2 million children from dying of malnutrition, the reality is most GMO products are not focused on food nutrition but rather pesticide use.  A Pesticides is a general term for a substance used to control or prevent unwanted pests, such as insects, weeds and diseases.  There are numerous types of pesticides, a few common types include herbicides (controlling…

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Posted on January 17, 2014 at 7:57pm

Thinking GMO part 1

Agriculture has advanced continuously throughout the ages to ensure that people have enough to eat.  In years past the majority of the worlds population were directly involved in agriculture and so they didn't fear these advancements.  That is no longer the case, at least not in the privileged countries of the world.  Here in Canada roughly 98% of the population has nothing to do with the growing of there food, excluding any small garden they may maintain.  So it should not come to any…

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Posted on January 10, 2014 at 7:06pm — 5 Comments

And a New Season Begins

The slow pace of winter is starting to give way to a renewed urgency to get things ready for planting season.  The winter has stubbornly refused to let go, but as the sun climbs higher in the sky and the hours of daylight continue to increase, its days are numbered.  That doesn't stop the cold mornings from putting on a show.

These poor ducks couldn't get there feet wet…

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Posted on April 9, 2013 at 9:30am

Trees, Farms, and Government

When it comes to the growing season for Canadian farms, the southern counties in Ontario rank among the longest seasons, with favorable weather patterns and productive soils.  The land is relatively flat and ideal for producing a multitude of crops.  The two most southerly counties, Kent and Essex have a significant role in Canadian agriculture.  But it wasn't always this way. 

Before the area was colonized this was a forested land with many poorly drained swamp like areas. …

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Posted on March 13, 2013 at 1:35pm

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At 9:14am on May 25, 2012, Mitch Lang said…

Gus - Great blog posts.  Very entertaining. lol

 
 
 

Agriculture Headlines from Farms.com Canada East News - click on title for full story

Ontario Asparagus Spearheads Spring Season

Spring has sprung, and so has Ontario's fresh local asparagus. Ontario asparagus farmers are working hard harvesting this year's crop for Ontarians to enjoy at their dinner tables.

Is It Time to Switch to Earlier Maturing Soybean Varieties?

The spring of 2019 has been unprecedented with excess rainfall and cool temperatures. This has significantly delayed soybean planting. When does it become necessary to switch to earlier maturing soybean varieties? There has been a trend in modern soybean production to plant early and to use long season varieties to achieve higher yields. This strategy has proven effective when soil conditions allow for early planting, but it’s also changed perceptions of what a “normal” planting date is for soybeans. When soybeans first gained popularity in Ontario over 50 years ago it was considered normal to wait until the May 24th weekend before seeding. This idea stemmed from the fact that soybeans cannot tolerate a killing frost once emerged. Soybeans are also a subtropical species and thrive under warm conditions. It was considered ideal to see soybeans twice in one week. First as seed in the planter, then as emerged seedlings within 7 days of planting. This will only happen under warm soil condi

Simcoe Agribusiness Breakfast Meeting Minutes – May 22, 2019

It was a small group in attendance at the Simcoe breakfast meeting this week. Some may have been busy with field work, but overall things are still moving slowly across the region and may not be moving at all on heavy soils that remain wet. Those in attendance reported that producers are optimistic planting will begin in a big way this coming weekend, or maybe into next week. While we are looking for more heat to move the winter wheat along and dry out fields for planting corn and soybeans, it is a good thing we do not see very high heat in the short-term forecast, which can bake the soil surface and trap moisture below on heavy ground.

Ontario Field Crop Report – Week of May 23rd, 2019

Weather patterns have been variable, leading to regional differences in progress on planting and crop growth. Soils continue to remain unfit for field operations in large parts of the province, especially in much of the southwest and parts of eastern Ontario (figure 1). A few pockets have had windows of opportunity to catch up on cultivation, fertilizer spreading, and planting.

Airblast Spraying in Poor Conditions

For many airblast operators, the spring of 2019 has been very difficult. The frequency and duration of rain events has left limited opportunity for orchard sprays. Even then, the periods between rains are transitions between warm and moist conditions and cold fronts, which makes wind gusty and changeable. These same periods leave wet alleys prone to rutting and compaction, and conditions that favour spraying may also favour pollinator activity.

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