Ontario Agriculture

The network for agriculture in Ontario, Canada

Covering agriculture has meant I've been to a pile of meetings. Meetings on getting more profit on your farm, meetings on government regulations, meetings on just about anything you can think of in order to help you be a better farmer. One of the topics that comes up a lot for livestock producers is developing a consistent product. While this usually is directed towards beef producers today, at one time it applied to everyone. Processors and retailers say if you want a better price - they need that consistent quality. They say without it, shoppers just won't look at your product, won't even give it a chance. Well, the reality is, as farmers we do need to improve consistency of our product, but it isn't just on our shoulders. Here's why... I do a lot of my shopping at Loblaw's branded stores. There isn't any real reason for it - other than they are the closest to my house. That means there is a lot of President's Choice product available. I don't buy a lot of meat from the grocery store, but now and again I will buy chicken. This time it was boneless skinless chicken breasts for a pasta dish I was trying out. When I got to opening that chicken I found it was far from boneless. (I've attached the picture of what I found underneath the breast) Needless to say I wasn't happy about having an extra step in my meal preparation. It did get me thinking though. If I was a consumer with no experience in cutting meat, and came across this unsightly scene - would I buy chicken more or less? I'm honestly worried about what their response is - because if they decide to eat less chicken, the poultry industry has lost a bit of their market - and it was completely out of their control. I'm not writing this to bash one particular brand. This is merely to point out that when retailers and processors say it's up to farmers to produce a better product, ask them what they are doing to bring in new customers and keep the ones they've got. In the words of Red Green - 'we're all in this together'.

Views: 14

Comment

You need to be a member of Ontario Agriculture to add comments!

Join Ontario Agriculture

Comment by Wayne Black on September 7, 2009 at 8:10pm
A similar situation is when we buy milk and it is soured long before the expiry (two days in our fridge). The first question from the brand manufacturer was "is your fridge the correct temperature?" So they mail some fridge thermometers. No power outage, using the same fridge since it was new (I think it was two or three years old at the time), and never had milk sour before its expiry before or since - uhm - did the retailer check their fridge?
I run across this usually at a restaurant when buying the 250 or 500 mL cartons. It is pretty sick when sludge pours out of your milk carton. If I was not involved in a dairy farm - probably would not buy milk again from that processor (funny how it is the same processor each time?!)
Wayne

Agriculture Headlines from Farms.com Canada East News - click on title for full story

Growing local crops with skilled labour critical during times of crisis

We are also a domestic and international propagator (grower) for the greenhouse business in Canada and of strawberry plants so even if you see strawberries in grocery stores that are labelled product of Georgia, Florida or other US states, the plants likely came from our farm in Ontario.

Should Carry-Over Soybean Seed Be Used this Spring?

There were a record number of unseeded acres last year. This means not all soybean seed intended for the 2019 growing season was used.

Does Soybean Photoperiod Sensitivity Impact Variety Selection?

There are two distinct growth stages in many crops; the vegetative and reproductive stages. In soybeans the vegetative stage usually lasts between 30 to 50 days after emergence.

Toronto Grocer Launches Initiative to Fund Emergency Food Relief

Fresh City, a Toronto farm and online and bricks and mortar grocer, announced today that it has partnered with FoodShare Toronto to assist in getting food to those in need at this critical time.

Controlling Scentless Chamomile with Herbicides

Scentless chamomile has a reputation for being difficult to control and a 2019 on-farm research trial evaluated several herbicide treatments. Although 10 treatments provided over 80% visual control of emerged plants, new seedlings continued to emerge several weeks after application resulting in a significant amount of plants at the end of August.

© 2020   Created by Darren Marsland.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service