Ontario Agriculture

The network for agriculture in Ontario, Canada

Day 8: Out with a bang! Battles, beers and baseball

The day started off early with a 6:30 departure from Alexandria, Virginia, with a two-hour drive to Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Our in-flight service was compliments of Tom and Robin and consisted of snacks, moist towelettes and entertainment! There's nothing wrong with a little pampering in the morning. :) The health and wellness team got the competitive juices flowing with an adult colouring contest with our fearless bus driver Nancy serving as the judge!

Upon arriving in Gettysburg, it's clear to see that it is still a town very much steeped in history and civil war culture. Evidence of the great battle can still be seen throughout the town with bullet holes in the buildings, the cellars where the citizens waited out the battle, the preservation of historic sites and the many memorials. Great efforts are being made to return the 6,000 acre state park to the state in which it would have been found in 1863. Largely consisting of wooded sites used for firewood and agricultural land for cash crops, it was nice to hear that the state has a good working relationship with the local farming community to still actively farm the land.


We arrived at the Cyclorama Film and Museum experience where we viewed a film about the battle of Gettysburg during the Civil War. It set the back drop for our day and we finished up in the Cyclorama viewing room.

It was a planetarium-like room with an oil canvas 42 feet high by 372 feet long displayed around the perimeter of the room. The display included an exhibit of props that are so well placed they appear to go into the painting bringing it to life and giving the sense that you are out on the battlefield.

We hopped back onto the bus where we met with Chris Rebmann our certified Gettysburg Battlefield guide. We spent the next 2.5 hrs with Chris immersed in the battle of Gettysburg and walked in the footsteps of the Union army as they fought in a grueling battle against the confederate army for three days from July 1st-3rd, 1863; a battle that would result in 50,000 casualties. We heard many stories of different leaders that fought in that battle and the different ways in which they led theirs troops to victory; some leading from behind and others from the front. There is something very humbling and sobering about standing on the grounds of a great battle; a battle that you know shaped history to create the world in which we are fortunate to live in today.

After hitting the streets of Gettysburg for lunch it was back on the bus to make our way to The Pennsylvania State College. Our bus ride consisted of a lively conversation about how we can apply the examples of leadership we learned about in the battle of Gettysburg to our roles in agriculture and the agricultural community as a whole. There was also the sponsor spotlight highlighting the newly launched "SeCan's growing trust" as well as group time to work on our IAP projects.

After checking into the hotel we met our Pennsylvania counterparts from the Rural-Urban Leadership (RULE) Program at a local Spikes minor league baseball game. The hospitality offered by our guests made us feel truly welcomed. The ever expanding network of agricultural leaders has never been more evident. The opportunity to connect and share in a relaxed atmosphere was second to none. The Spikes won the game and we celebrated with fireworks!

Leadership was presented today through the lens of the in battle of Gettysburg. As a class we took away that as leaders we have to be adaptable, confident and willing to accept change. We all have difficult decisions to make everyday; the true leaders accept change and lead their peers in the direction of change.

-Class 16

Views: 291

Comment

You need to be a member of Ontario Agriculture to add comments!

Join Ontario Agriculture

Comment by OntAG Admin on July 15, 2016 at 8:00am

It sounds like a very thoughtful and profound experiences for everyone.

Agriculture Headlines from Farms.com Canada East News - click on title for full story

Cattle Numbers Lowest In Decades

According to a Statistic Canada report, there were 11.1 million cattle and calves on farms, down more than 2 percent from the previous year and the lowest number since 1989. In Alberta, there were 4.7 million head on all beef cattle operations as of January 1st. That's down 85 thousand from a year ago. Cow/calf operations were up 18 thousand head year over year to around 2.6 million, while the drop came in feeder and stocker operations which were down over 157 thousand head to 956 thousand. Drought conditions and tight feed supplies, coupled with good prices, resulted in more breeding stock heading to market. Producers held 0.7 percent fewer feeder heifers and three percent fewer calves compared to a year ago. Average warm carcass weight increased 18 percent over the past 25 years, which helped offset the decline in beef production. The Stats-Can report also took a glance at other livestock on-farm. Canadian hog producers reported 13.8 million hogs on their farms on January 1st., dow

WHEN DO I TURN OUT MY COWS? MANAGING SPRING PASTURES DURING AND AFTER DROUGHT

Beef producers will soon be making grazing plans for turning their herds out to spring pastures. While drought planning should be a routine part of the development of short- and long-term grazing plans, many beef cattle herds have withstood successive years of drought. This has prompted producers to hone in on their management skills to make the best use of their pasture forage and carefully maintain carryover to prevent prolonged damage. The question of ‘when can I turn my cows out?’ is an important one, especially for those with dwindling hays stacks or for producers purchasing feed.   Dr. Edward Bork is a Professor of Rangeland Management in the faculty of Agricultural, Life, and Environmental Sciences at the University of Alberta. He says that, aside from spring rainfall, how your pastures looked when you brought cattle in last fall may be the best indicator of how they will perform in spring. “The better condition the pasture was in October, the faster it will recover,” Bork expl

JPD Angus Wins 2024 Mapleseed Pasture Award

The Beef Farmers of Ontario, Mapleseed and the Ontario Forage Council, sponsors of the Ontario Mapleseed Pasture Award, have announced that the Chalmers family of JPD Angus of Oro-Medonte in Simcoe County are the recipients of the 2024 Mapleseed Pasture Award

Minister MacAulay promotes Canada’s world-class products in Malaysia and the Philippines

This week, the Honourable Lawrence MacAulay, Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, visited Malaysia and the Philippines to strengthen regional partnerships and create new opportunities for our hardworking Canadian producers.

Expansion of the emerald ash borer regulated area in Québec

As part of its commitment to protect Canada’s plant resource base from pests, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has put in place measures intended to protect Canada's economy by preventing the spread of emerald ash borer (EAB) to non-infested areas of Canada. The CFIA has updated its regulated areas for EAB to include additional Regional County Municipalities (RCM) in Québec. This expansion is due to detections of EAB in 2022 and 2023 in Québec.

© 2024   Created by Darren Marsland.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service