Ontario Agriculture

The network for agriculture in Ontario, Canada

Our first day in Hanoi started early with a tour out of the city and then off to a village to visit a local market and see the gardens where fresh vegetables and fruit are produced for Hanoi. The class excitement  could be felt as the experience was an authentic stop where tourists do not frequent.

After walking through the market looking at fresh meat, vegetables and fruit, we walked along the gardens and took in a breath of agriculture. The gardens were hand tended and well looked after. We saw lots cabbage, snap beans, tomatoes, lettuce, various Asian greens and herbs, guava, broccoli, radish and lots more! 

We then gathered at a local farmers house to enjoy a tea break.

The class heard a sponsor spotlight from Jen Kyle and Aaron Breimer on the Ontario Farmer along the bus ride to the village. In an age where print newspapers are in decline, it's nice to hear that that the Ontario Farmer is still the preferred source of news for the agriculture industry in Ontario.

Back in Hanoi, our tour guide Danny showed us some sites of the city and gave us a government, war and Vietnamese culture lesson. We stopped at Ho Chi Minh Mausoleum square where we walked around looking at the government buildings, tomb of Ho Chi Minh and the Canadian Embassy. The influence of Ho Chi Minh on the history of Vietnam's independence from the French was reflected upon as it was pivotal in the current independence of the country from foreign rule.
Lunch was served at a traditional Vietnamese restaurant, called Ngon Villa, where the group reflected on the mornings tours and stops.

In the afternoon we returned to the hotel to meet with Nicholas Drouin, the First Development Secretary and Tran Tuan Anh, trade commissioner both from the Canadian Embassy in Vietnam. Nicholas and Tran gave a great presentation to the class about the current development and trade missions Canada is engaging in Vietnam. They outlined the importance of Vietnam as a trading partner as it is the fastest growing economy in Asia. Vietnam values Canadian quality import products such as seafood, wheat, beef and soybeans.

In late afternoon the class had an opportunity to take to the streets and embarked on a cyclo tour around the downtown and market areas in Hanoi.

Views: 194

Comment

You need to be a member of Ontario Agriculture to add comments!

Join Ontario Agriculture

Agriculture Headlines from Farms.com Canada East News - click on title for full story

Canopy Growth acquires hemp company AgriNextUSA in a move to boost U.S. business

Canopy Growth Corp. has acquired AgriNextUSA, in a move to boost its hemp business in the United States. Financial terms of the deal were not immediately available. Canopy says AgriNextUSA chief executive Geoff Whaling will join Canopy Growth USA as a strategic adviser. It says Whaling is considered a hemp pioneer and a leading advocate for the sector in the United States.

Agriculture, trade ministers will testify in April on Chinese canola issue

A pair of federal cabinet ministers have been called on to testify before a parliamentary committee on China's move to reject canola shipments from one of Canada's largest grain producers.

Fine-tuning Nitrogen Strategies on Corn

The nitrogen (N) fertility algorithm proposed at the recent Eastern Ontario Crop Conference by Dr. Dave Hooker, University of Guelph- Ridgetown Campus, was “80% of the recommended N applied pre-plant, then 1 lb/ac of additional N for each millimetre (mm) of rain from the V7 to VT corn growth stage.”

Chronic Wasting Disease a Concern for Ontario

Last weekend CFFO staff attended the Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters’ Conference on Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) to learn from the scientists about the potential threat of CWD entering Ontario. CWD, is a neurodegenerative disease that affects members of the deer family, including white-tailed deer, moose, elk, caribou, and mule deer, among others.

To Clean or Not to Clean? Managing DON in Grain Corn

A number of growers cleaned corn this fall in efforts to reduce DON. Whether it is on the combine or at the bins, the general message is to remove as much fines or cob as possible as these harbour the highest levels of DON. Cleaning reports were variable however; some reported good luck in reducing DON, while others reported little or no change.

© 2019   Created by Darren Marsland.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service